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Solutions for Chapter 3.5: Cross Product

Full solutions for Elementary Linear Algebra: Applications Version | 10th Edition

ISBN: 9780470432051

Solutions for Chapter 3.5: Cross Product

Solutions for Chapter 3.5
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Textbook: Elementary Linear Algebra: Applications Version
Edition: 10
Author: Howard Anton, Chris Rorres
ISBN: 9780470432051

Chapter 3.5: Cross Product includes 46 full step-by-step solutions. Elementary Linear Algebra: Applications Version was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470432051. Since 46 problems in chapter 3.5: Cross Product have been answered, more than 13751 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Linear Algebra: Applications Version, edition: 10.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

    peA) = det(A - AI) has peA) = zero matrix.

  • Column space C (A) =

    space of all combinations of the columns of A.

  • Commuting matrices AB = BA.

    If diagonalizable, they share n eigenvectors.

  • Covariance matrix:E.

    When random variables Xi have mean = average value = 0, their covariances "'£ ij are the averages of XiX j. With means Xi, the matrix :E = mean of (x - x) (x - x) T is positive (semi)definite; :E is diagonal if the Xi are independent.

  • Diagonalizable matrix A.

    Must have n independent eigenvectors (in the columns of S; automatic with n different eigenvalues). Then S-I AS = A = eigenvalue matrix.

  • Diagonalization

    A = S-1 AS. A = eigenvalue matrix and S = eigenvector matrix of A. A must have n independent eigenvectors to make S invertible. All Ak = SA k S-I.

  • Elimination matrix = Elementary matrix Eij.

    The identity matrix with an extra -eij in the i, j entry (i #- j). Then Eij A subtracts eij times row j of A from row i.

  • Factorization

    A = L U. If elimination takes A to U without row exchanges, then the lower triangular L with multipliers eij (and eii = 1) brings U back to A.

  • Fast Fourier Transform (FFT).

    A factorization of the Fourier matrix Fn into e = log2 n matrices Si times a permutation. Each Si needs only nl2 multiplications, so Fnx and Fn-1c can be computed with ne/2 multiplications. Revolutionary.

  • Graph G.

    Set of n nodes connected pairwise by m edges. A complete graph has all n(n - 1)/2 edges between nodes. A tree has only n - 1 edges and no closed loops.

  • Independent vectors VI, .. " vk.

    No combination cl VI + ... + qVk = zero vector unless all ci = O. If the v's are the columns of A, the only solution to Ax = 0 is x = o.

  • lA-II = l/lAI and IATI = IAI.

    The big formula for det(A) has a sum of n! terms, the cofactor formula uses determinants of size n - 1, volume of box = I det( A) I.

  • Multiplication Ax

    = Xl (column 1) + ... + xn(column n) = combination of columns.

  • Multiplier eij.

    The pivot row j is multiplied by eij and subtracted from row i to eliminate the i, j entry: eij = (entry to eliminate) / (jth pivot).

  • Orthogonal matrix Q.

    Square matrix with orthonormal columns, so QT = Q-l. Preserves length and angles, IIQxll = IIxll and (QX)T(Qy) = xTy. AlllAI = 1, with orthogonal eigenvectors. Examples: Rotation, reflection, permutation.

  • Rayleigh quotient q (x) = X T Ax I x T x for symmetric A: Amin < q (x) < Amax.

    Those extremes are reached at the eigenvectors x for Amin(A) and Amax(A).

  • Standard basis for Rn.

    Columns of n by n identity matrix (written i ,j ,k in R3).

  • Toeplitz matrix.

    Constant down each diagonal = time-invariant (shift-invariant) filter.

  • Transpose matrix AT.

    Entries AL = Ajj. AT is n by In, AT A is square, symmetric, positive semidefinite. The transposes of AB and A-I are BT AT and (AT)-I.

  • Vector space V.

    Set of vectors such that all combinations cv + d w remain within V. Eight required rules are given in Section 3.1 for scalars c, d and vectors v, w.

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