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Solutions for Chapter 9.5: Measures of Dispersion

Full solutions for Finite Mathematics, Binder Ready Version: An Applied Approach | 11th Edition

ISBN: 9780470876398

Solutions for Chapter 9.5: Measures of Dispersion

Solutions for Chapter 9.5
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Textbook: Finite Mathematics, Binder Ready Version: An Applied Approach
Edition: 11
Author: Michael Sullivan
ISBN: 9780470876398

Chapter 9.5: Measures of Dispersion includes 36 full step-by-step solutions. Since 36 problems in chapter 9.5: Measures of Dispersion have been answered, more than 17976 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Finite Mathematics, Binder Ready Version: An Applied Approach was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470876398. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Finite Mathematics, Binder Ready Version: An Applied Approach, edition: 11.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Augmented matrix [A b].

    Ax = b is solvable when b is in the column space of A; then [A b] has the same rank as A. Elimination on [A b] keeps equations correct.

  • Cramer's Rule for Ax = b.

    B j has b replacing column j of A; x j = det B j I det A

  • Dimension of vector space

    dim(V) = number of vectors in any basis for V.

  • Free columns of A.

    Columns without pivots; these are combinations of earlier columns.

  • Free variable Xi.

    Column i has no pivot in elimination. We can give the n - r free variables any values, then Ax = b determines the r pivot variables (if solvable!).

  • Inverse matrix A-I.

    Square matrix with A-I A = I and AA-l = I. No inverse if det A = 0 and rank(A) < n and Ax = 0 for a nonzero vector x. The inverses of AB and AT are B-1 A-I and (A-I)T. Cofactor formula (A-l)ij = Cji! detA.

  • Jordan form 1 = M- 1 AM.

    If A has s independent eigenvectors, its "generalized" eigenvector matrix M gives 1 = diag(lt, ... , 1s). The block his Akh +Nk where Nk has 1 's on diagonall. Each block has one eigenvalue Ak and one eigenvector.

  • Kronecker product (tensor product) A ® B.

    Blocks aij B, eigenvalues Ap(A)Aq(B).

  • Least squares solution X.

    The vector x that minimizes the error lie 112 solves AT Ax = ATb. Then e = b - Ax is orthogonal to all columns of A.

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Orthonormal vectors q 1 , ... , q n·

    Dot products are q T q j = 0 if i =1= j and q T q i = 1. The matrix Q with these orthonormal columns has Q T Q = I. If m = n then Q T = Q -1 and q 1 ' ... , q n is an orthonormal basis for Rn : every v = L (v T q j )q j •

  • Particular solution x p.

    Any solution to Ax = b; often x p has free variables = o.

  • Pascal matrix

    Ps = pascal(n) = the symmetric matrix with binomial entries (i1~;2). Ps = PL Pu all contain Pascal's triangle with det = 1 (see Pascal in the index).

  • Projection matrix P onto subspace S.

    Projection p = P b is the closest point to b in S, error e = b - Pb is perpendicularto S. p 2 = P = pT, eigenvalues are 1 or 0, eigenvectors are in S or S...L. If columns of A = basis for S then P = A (AT A) -1 AT.

  • Pseudoinverse A+ (Moore-Penrose inverse).

    The n by m matrix that "inverts" A from column space back to row space, with N(A+) = N(AT). A+ A and AA+ are the projection matrices onto the row space and column space. Rank(A +) = rank(A).

  • Singular matrix A.

    A square matrix that has no inverse: det(A) = o.

  • Solvable system Ax = b.

    The right side b is in the column space of A.

  • Spectrum of A = the set of eigenvalues {A I, ... , An}.

    Spectral radius = max of IAi I.

  • Subspace S of V.

    Any vector space inside V, including V and Z = {zero vector only}.

  • Transpose matrix AT.

    Entries AL = Ajj. AT is n by In, AT A is square, symmetric, positive semidefinite. The transposes of AB and A-I are BT AT and (AT)-I.

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