×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide

Solutions for Chapter 1.6: Dot Product, Norm, Angle, and Distance

Full solutions for Linear Algebra with Applications | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9781449679545

Solutions for Chapter 1.6: Dot Product, Norm, Angle, and Distance

Solutions for Chapter 1.6
4 5 0 403 Reviews
27
1
Textbook: Linear Algebra with Applications
Edition: 8
Author: Gareth Williams
ISBN: 9781449679545

Since 39 problems in chapter 1.6: Dot Product, Norm, Angle, and Distance have been answered, more than 8436 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 1.6: Dot Product, Norm, Angle, and Distance includes 39 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Linear Algebra with Applications, edition: 8. Linear Algebra with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781449679545. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Augmented matrix [A b].

    Ax = b is solvable when b is in the column space of A; then [A b] has the same rank as A. Elimination on [A b] keeps equations correct.

  • Column picture of Ax = b.

    The vector b becomes a combination of the columns of A. The system is solvable only when b is in the column space C (A).

  • Column space C (A) =

    space of all combinations of the columns of A.

  • Cyclic shift

    S. Permutation with S21 = 1, S32 = 1, ... , finally SIn = 1. Its eigenvalues are the nth roots e2lrik/n of 1; eigenvectors are columns of the Fourier matrix F.

  • Diagonalization

    A = S-1 AS. A = eigenvalue matrix and S = eigenvector matrix of A. A must have n independent eigenvectors to make S invertible. All Ak = SA k S-I.

  • Elimination.

    A sequence of row operations that reduces A to an upper triangular U or to the reduced form R = rref(A). Then A = LU with multipliers eO in L, or P A = L U with row exchanges in P, or E A = R with an invertible E.

  • Hilbert matrix hilb(n).

    Entries HU = 1/(i + j -1) = Jd X i- 1 xj-1dx. Positive definite but extremely small Amin and large condition number: H is ill-conditioned.

  • Identity matrix I (or In).

    Diagonal entries = 1, off-diagonal entries = 0.

  • Nilpotent matrix N.

    Some power of N is the zero matrix, N k = o. The only eigenvalue is A = 0 (repeated n times). Examples: triangular matrices with zero diagonal.

  • Orthogonal matrix Q.

    Square matrix with orthonormal columns, so QT = Q-l. Preserves length and angles, IIQxll = IIxll and (QX)T(Qy) = xTy. AlllAI = 1, with orthogonal eigenvectors. Examples: Rotation, reflection, permutation.

  • Pivot columns of A.

    Columns that contain pivots after row reduction. These are not combinations of earlier columns. The pivot columns are a basis for the column space.

  • Plane (or hyperplane) in Rn.

    Vectors x with aT x = O. Plane is perpendicular to a =1= O.

  • Positive definite matrix A.

    Symmetric matrix with positive eigenvalues and positive pivots. Definition: x T Ax > 0 unless x = O. Then A = LDLT with diag(D» O.

  • Random matrix rand(n) or randn(n).

    MATLAB creates a matrix with random entries, uniformly distributed on [0 1] for rand and standard normal distribution for randn.

  • Rayleigh quotient q (x) = X T Ax I x T x for symmetric A: Amin < q (x) < Amax.

    Those extremes are reached at the eigenvectors x for Amin(A) and Amax(A).

  • Singular Value Decomposition

    (SVD) A = U:E VT = (orthogonal) ( diag)( orthogonal) First r columns of U and V are orthonormal bases of C (A) and C (AT), AVi = O'iUi with singular value O'i > O. Last columns are orthonormal bases of nullspaces.

  • Skew-symmetric matrix K.

    The transpose is -K, since Kij = -Kji. Eigenvalues are pure imaginary, eigenvectors are orthogonal, eKt is an orthogonal matrix.

  • Sum V + W of subs paces.

    Space of all (v in V) + (w in W). Direct sum: V n W = to}.

  • Symmetric matrix A.

    The transpose is AT = A, and aU = a ji. A-I is also symmetric.

  • Vector v in Rn.

    Sequence of n real numbers v = (VI, ... , Vn) = point in Rn.

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide
Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to Math - Textbook Survival Guide
×
Reset your password