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Solutions for Chapter 6: Inverse Circular Functions and Trigonometric Equations

Full solutions for Trigonometry | 11th Edition

ISBN: 9780134217437

Solutions for Chapter 6: Inverse Circular Functions and Trigonometric Equations

Solutions for Chapter 6
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Textbook: Trigonometry
Edition: 11
Author: Margaret L. Lial, John Hornsby, David I. Schneider, Callie Daniels
ISBN: 9780134217437

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Trigonometry, edition: 11. Since 66 problems in chapter 6: Inverse Circular Functions and Trigonometric Equations have been answered, more than 19511 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Trigonometry was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780134217437. Chapter 6: Inverse Circular Functions and Trigonometric Equations includes 66 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Back substitution.

    Upper triangular systems are solved in reverse order Xn to Xl.

  • Change of basis matrix M.

    The old basis vectors v j are combinations L mij Wi of the new basis vectors. The coordinates of CI VI + ... + cnvn = dl wI + ... + dn Wn are related by d = M c. (For n = 2 set VI = mll WI +m21 W2, V2 = m12WI +m22w2.)

  • Commuting matrices AB = BA.

    If diagonalizable, they share n eigenvectors.

  • Condition number

    cond(A) = c(A) = IIAIlIIA-III = amaxlamin. In Ax = b, the relative change Ilox III Ilx II is less than cond(A) times the relative change Ilob III lib II· Condition numbers measure the sensitivity of the output to change in the input.

  • Covariance matrix:E.

    When random variables Xi have mean = average value = 0, their covariances "'£ ij are the averages of XiX j. With means Xi, the matrix :E = mean of (x - x) (x - x) T is positive (semi)definite; :E is diagonal if the Xi are independent.

  • Diagonal matrix D.

    dij = 0 if i #- j. Block-diagonal: zero outside square blocks Du.

  • Elimination matrix = Elementary matrix Eij.

    The identity matrix with an extra -eij in the i, j entry (i #- j). Then Eij A subtracts eij times row j of A from row i.

  • Elimination.

    A sequence of row operations that reduces A to an upper triangular U or to the reduced form R = rref(A). Then A = LU with multipliers eO in L, or P A = L U with row exchanges in P, or E A = R with an invertible E.

  • Factorization

    A = L U. If elimination takes A to U without row exchanges, then the lower triangular L with multipliers eij (and eii = 1) brings U back to A.

  • Fourier matrix F.

    Entries Fjk = e21Cijk/n give orthogonal columns FT F = nI. Then y = Fe is the (inverse) Discrete Fourier Transform Y j = L cke21Cijk/n.

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Hermitian matrix A H = AT = A.

    Complex analog a j i = aU of a symmetric matrix.

  • Left inverse A+.

    If A has full column rank n, then A+ = (AT A)-I AT has A+ A = In.

  • Linear transformation T.

    Each vector V in the input space transforms to T (v) in the output space, and linearity requires T(cv + dw) = c T(v) + d T(w). Examples: Matrix multiplication A v, differentiation and integration in function space.

  • Matrix multiplication AB.

    The i, j entry of AB is (row i of A)·(column j of B) = L aikbkj. By columns: Column j of AB = A times column j of B. By rows: row i of A multiplies B. Columns times rows: AB = sum of (column k)(row k). All these equivalent definitions come from the rule that A B times x equals A times B x .

  • Multiplicities AM and G M.

    The algebraic multiplicity A M of A is the number of times A appears as a root of det(A - AI) = O. The geometric multiplicity GM is the number of independent eigenvectors for A (= dimension of the eigenspace).

  • Network.

    A directed graph that has constants Cl, ... , Cm associated with the edges.

  • Rank r (A)

    = number of pivots = dimension of column space = dimension of row space.

  • Reduced row echelon form R = rref(A).

    Pivots = 1; zeros above and below pivots; the r nonzero rows of R give a basis for the row space of A.

  • Sum V + W of subs paces.

    Space of all (v in V) + (w in W). Direct sum: V n W = to}.

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