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Solutions for Chapter 8.2: Linear Algebra and Its Applications 4th Edition

Linear Algebra and Its Applications | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321385178 | Authors: David C. Lay

Full solutions for Linear Algebra and Its Applications | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780321385178

Linear Algebra and Its Applications | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321385178 | Authors: David C. Lay

Solutions for Chapter 8.2

Solutions for Chapter 8.2
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Textbook: Linear Algebra and Its Applications
Edition: 4
Author: David C. Lay
ISBN: 9780321385178

Chapter 8.2 includes 24 full step-by-step solutions. Since 24 problems in chapter 8.2 have been answered, more than 32653 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Linear Algebra and Its Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321385178. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Linear Algebra and Its Applications, edition: 4.

Key Math Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Associative Law (AB)C = A(BC).

    Parentheses can be removed to leave ABC.

  • Augmented matrix [A b].

    Ax = b is solvable when b is in the column space of A; then [A b] has the same rank as A. Elimination on [A b] keeps equations correct.

  • Cayley-Hamilton Theorem.

    peA) = det(A - AI) has peA) = zero matrix.

  • Commuting matrices AB = BA.

    If diagonalizable, they share n eigenvectors.

  • Elimination.

    A sequence of row operations that reduces A to an upper triangular U or to the reduced form R = rref(A). Then A = LU with multipliers eO in L, or P A = L U with row exchanges in P, or E A = R with an invertible E.

  • Exponential eAt = I + At + (At)2 12! + ...

    has derivative AeAt; eAt u(O) solves u' = Au.

  • Four Fundamental Subspaces C (A), N (A), C (AT), N (AT).

    Use AT for complex A.

  • Gram-Schmidt orthogonalization A = QR.

    Independent columns in A, orthonormal columns in Q. Each column q j of Q is a combination of the first j columns of A (and conversely, so R is upper triangular). Convention: diag(R) > o.

  • Hankel matrix H.

    Constant along each antidiagonal; hij depends on i + j.

  • Hermitian matrix A H = AT = A.

    Complex analog a j i = aU of a symmetric matrix.

  • Hessenberg matrix H.

    Triangular matrix with one extra nonzero adjacent diagonal.

  • Kronecker product (tensor product) A ® B.

    Blocks aij B, eigenvalues Ap(A)Aq(B).

  • Network.

    A directed graph that has constants Cl, ... , Cm associated with the edges.

  • Partial pivoting.

    In each column, choose the largest available pivot to control roundoff; all multipliers have leij I < 1. See condition number.

  • Plane (or hyperplane) in Rn.

    Vectors x with aT x = O. Plane is perpendicular to a =1= O.

  • Polar decomposition A = Q H.

    Orthogonal Q times positive (semi)definite H.

  • Positive definite matrix A.

    Symmetric matrix with positive eigenvalues and positive pivots. Definition: x T Ax > 0 unless x = O. Then A = LDLT with diag(D» O.

  • Row picture of Ax = b.

    Each equation gives a plane in Rn; the planes intersect at x.

  • Schur complement S, D - C A -} B.

    Appears in block elimination on [~ g ].

  • Similar matrices A and B.

    Every B = M-I AM has the same eigenvalues as A.

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