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Solutions for Chapter 16: Fundamentals of Physics: 9th Edition

Fundamentals of Physics: | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780470556535 | Authors: David Halliday; Robert Resnick; Jearl Walker

Full solutions for Fundamentals of Physics: | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780470556535

Fundamentals of Physics: | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780470556535 | Authors: David Halliday; Robert Resnick; Jearl Walker

Solutions for Chapter 16

Solutions for Chapter 16
4 5 0 312 Reviews
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Textbook: Fundamentals of Physics:
Edition: 9
Author: David Halliday; Robert Resnick; Jearl Walker
ISBN: 9780470556535

Summary of Chapter 16:

One of the primary subjects of physics is waves. To see how important waves are in the modern world, just consider the music industry. Every piece of I music you hear, from some retro-punk band playing in a campus dive to the most I eloquent concerto playing on the Web, depends on performers producing waves and your detecting those waves. In between production and detection, the infor- mation carried by the waves might need to be transmitted (as in a live perfor- mance on the Web) or recorded and then reproduced (as with CDs, DVDs, or the other devices currently being developed in engineering labs worldwide). The financial importance of controlling music waves is staggering, and the rewards to engineers who develop new control techniques can be rich. This chapter focuses on waves traveling along a stretched string, such as on a guitar. The next chapter focuses on sound waves, such as those produced by a guitar string being played. Before we do all this, though, our first job is to clas- sify the countless waves of the everyday world into basic types. 16-2 Types of Waves Waves are of three main types: I I I I I I I I I I I I 1. Mechanical waves. These waves are most familiar because we encounter I them almost constantly; common examples include water waves, sound waves, and seismic waves. All these waves have two central features: They are gov- erned by Newton's laws, and they can exist only within a material medium, such as water, air, and rock. 2. Electromagnetic waves. These waves are less familiar, but you use them constantly; common examples include visible and ultraviolet light, radio and television waves, microwaves, x rays, and radar waves. These waves require no material medium to exist. Light waves from stars, for example, travel through the vacuum of space to reach us. All electromagnetic waves travel through a vacuum at the same speed c = 299792458 m/s. 3. Matter waves. Although these waves are commonly used in modern tech- nology, they are probably very unfamiliar to you. These waves are associated with electrons, protons, and other fundamental particles, and even atoms and molecules. Because we commonly think of these particles as constituting mat- ter, such waves are called matter waves. Much of what we discuss in this chapter applies to waves of all kinds. However, for specific examples we shall refer to mechanical waves.

Fundamentals of Physics: was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470556535. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Fundamentals of Physics:, edition: 9. Since 94 problems in chapter 16 have been answered, more than 100988 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 16 includes 94 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Physics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • //

    parallel

  • any symbol

    average (indicated by a bar over a symbol—e.g., v¯ is average velocity)

  • °C

    Celsius degree

  • °F

    Fahrenheit degree

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