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Solutions for Chapter 21: Fundamentals of Physics: 9th Edition

Fundamentals of Physics: | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780470556535 | Authors: David Halliday; Robert Resnick; Jearl Walker

Full solutions for Fundamentals of Physics: | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780470556535

Fundamentals of Physics: | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780470556535 | Authors: David Halliday; Robert Resnick; Jearl Walker

Solutions for Chapter 21

Solutions for Chapter 21
4 5 0 325 Reviews
20
1
Textbook: Fundamentals of Physics:
Edition: 9
Author: David Halliday; Robert Resnick; Jearl Walker
ISBN: 9780470556535

Summary of Chapter 21:

You are surrounded by devices that depend on the physics of electro- magnetism, which is the combination of electric and magnetic phenomena. This physics is at the root of computers, television, radio, telecommunications, house- hold lighting, and even the ability of food wrap to cling to a container. This physics is also the basis of the natural world. Not only does it hold together all the atoms and molecules in the world, it also produces lightning, auroras, and rainbows. The physics of electromagnetism was first studied by the early Greek philosophers, who discovered that if a piece of amber is rubbed and then brought near bits of straw, the straw will jump to the amber. We now know that the attrac- tion between amber and straw is due to an electric force. The Greek philosophers also discovered that if a certain type of stone (a naturally occurring magnet) is brought near bits of iron, the iron will jump to the stone. We now know that the attraction between magnet and iron is due to a magnetic force. From these modest origins with the Greek philosophers, the sciences of electricity and magnetism developed separately for centuries-until 1820, in fact, when Hans Christian Oersted found a connection between them: an electric cur- rent in a wire can deflect a magnetic compass needle. Interestingly enough, Oersted made this discovery, a big surprise, while preparing a lecture demonstra- tion for his physics students. The new sCience of electromagnetism was developed further by workers in many countries. One of the best was Michael Faraday, a truly gifted experimenter with a talent for physical intuition and visualization. That talent is attested to by the fact that his collected laboratory notebooks do not contain a single equation. In the mid-nineteenth century, James Clerk Maxwell put Faraday's ideas into mathematical form, introduced many new ideas of his own, and put electromag- netism on a sound theoretical basis. Our discussion of electromagnetism is spread through the next 16 chapters. We begin with electrical phenomena, and our first step is to discuss the nature of electric charge and electric force. 21-2 In dry weather, you can produce a spark by walking across certain types of carpet and then bringing one of your fingers near a metal doorknob, metal faucet, or even a friend. You can also produce multiple sparks when you pull, say, a sweater from your body or clothes from a dryer. Sparks and the "static cling" of clothing (similar to what is seen in Fig. 21-1) are usually just annoying. However, if you happen to pull off a sweater and then spark to a computer, the results are more than just annoying.

Since 67 problems in chapter 21 have been answered, more than 101145 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 21 includes 67 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Fundamentals of Physics:, edition: 9. Fundamentals of Physics: was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780470556535.

Key Physics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • //

    parallel

  • any symbol

    average (indicated by a bar over a symbol—e.g., v¯ is average velocity)

  • °C

    Celsius degree

  • °F

    Fahrenheit degree

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