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Textbooks / Science / Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals 2

Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals 2nd Edition Solutions

Do I need to buy Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals | 2nd Edition to pass the class?

ISBN: 9781118741030

Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals | 2nd Edition - Solutions by Chapter

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Textbook: Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals
Edition: 2
Author: Jeffrey L. Helms; Daniel T. Rogers
ISBN: 9781118741030

Since problems from 0 chapters in Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals have been answered, more than 200 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals, edition: 2. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals were answered by , our top Science solution expert on 10/03/18, 06:29PM. Majoring in Psychology: Achieving Your Educational and Career Goals was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781118741030. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 0.

Key Science Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Artesian well

    A well in which the water rises above the level where it was initially encountered.

  • Compound

    A substance formed by the chemical combination of two or more elements in definite proportions and usually having properties different from those of its constituent elements.

  • Correlation

    Establishing the equivalence of rocks of similar age in different areas.

  • Cross-cutting

    A principle of relative dating. A rock or fault is younger than any rock (or fault) through which it cuts.

  • Exfoliation dome

    Large, dome-shaped structure, usually composed of granite, formed by sheeting.

  • Glassy texture

    A term used to describe the texture of certain igneous rocks, such as obsidian, that contain no crystals.

  • Hertzsprung-Russell diagram

    See H-R diagram.

  • Local group

    The cluster of 20 or so galaxies to which our galaxy belongs.

  • Mesocyclone

    An intense, rotating wind system in the lower part of a thunderstorm that precedes tornado development.

  • Oceanic ridge system

    A continuous elevated zone on the floor of all the major ocean basins and varying in width from 500 to 5,000 kilometers (300–3,000 miles). The rifts at the crests of ridges represent divergent plate boundaries.

  • Pipe

    A vertical conduit through which magmatic materials have passed.

  • Ptolemaic system

    An Earth-centered system of the universe.

  • Saturation

    The maximum quantity of water vapor that the air can hold at any given temperature and pressure.

  • Semidiurnal tidal pattern

    A tidal pattern exhibiting two high tides and two low tides per tidal day with small inequalities between successive highs and successive lows; a semi-daily tide.

  • Steppe

    One of the two types of dry climate. A marginal and more humid variant of the desert that separates it from bordering humid climates.

  • Strata

    Parallel layers of sedimentary rock.

  • Travertine

    A form of limestone that is deposited by hot springs or as a cave deposit.

  • Umbra

    The central, completely dark part of a shadow produced during an eclipse.

  • Unsaturated zone

    The area above the water table where openings in soil, sediment, and rock are not saturated but filled mainly with air.

  • Unstable air

    Air that does not resist vertical displacement. If it is lifted, its temperature will not cool as rapidly as the surrounding environment, so it will continue to rise on its own.