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Solutions for Chapter 1.1: Arguments, Premises, and Conclusions

A Concise Introduction to Logic | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9781285196541 | Authors: Patrick J. Hurley

Full solutions for A Concise Introduction to Logic | 12th Edition

ISBN: 9781285196541

A Concise Introduction to Logic | 12th Edition | ISBN: 9781285196541 | Authors: Patrick J. Hurley

Solutions for Chapter 1.1: Arguments, Premises, and Conclusions

Solutions for Chapter 1.1
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Textbook: A Concise Introduction to Logic
Edition: 12
Author: Patrick J. Hurley
ISBN: 9781285196541

A Concise Introduction to Logic was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781285196541. Chapter 1.1: Arguments, Premises, and Conclusions includes 30 full step-by-step solutions. Since 30 problems in chapter 1.1: Arguments, Premises, and Conclusions have been answered, more than 36591 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: A Concise Introduction to Logic, edition: 12. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Science Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Aphelion

    The place in the orbit of a planet where the planet is farthest from the Sun.

  • Astronomical theory

    A theory of climatic change first developed by Yugoslavian astronomer Milutin Milankovitch. It is based on changes in the shape of Earth’s orbit, variations in the obliquity of Earth’s axis, and the wobbling of Earth’s axis.

  • Calving

    Wastage of a glacier that occurs when large pieces of ice break off into water.

  • Convergence

    The condition that exists when the distribution of winds within a given area results in a net horizontal inflow of air into the area. Because convergence at lower levels is associated with an upward movement of air, areas of convergent winds are regions favorable to cloud formation and precipitation.

  • Drift

    See Glacial drift.

  • Evolution (Theory of)

    A fundamental theory in biology and paleontology that sets forth the process by which members of a population of organisms come to differ from their ancestors. Organisms evolve by means of mutations, natural selection, and genetic factors. Modern species are descended from related but different species that lived in earlier times.

  • Focus (earthquake)

    The zone within Earth where rock displacement produces an earthquake.

  • Hail

    Nearly spherical ice pellets having concentric layers and formed by the successive freezing of layers of water.

  • Leaching

    The depletion of soluble materials from the upper soil by downward-percolating water.

  • Local group

    The cluster of 20 or so galaxies to which our galaxy belongs.

  • Meteor

    The luminous phenomenon observed when a meteoroid enters Earth’s atmosphere and burns up; popularly called a “shooting star.”

  • Normal polarity

    A magnetic field that is the same as that which exists at present.

  • Proton

    A positively charged subatomic particle found in the nucleus of an atom.

  • Psychrometer

    A device consisting of two thermometers (wet bulb and dry bulb) that is rapidly whirled and, with the use of tables, yields the relative humidity and dew point.

  • Radiocarbon (carbon-14)

    The radioactive isotope of carbon, which is produced continuously in the atmosphere and is used in dating events from the very recent geologic past (the last few tens of thousands of years).

  • Seismic waves

    A rapidly moving ocean wave generated by earthquake activity capable of inflicting heavy damage in coastal regions.

  • Silicate

    Any one of numerous minerals that have the oxygen and silicon tetrahedron as their basic structure.

  • Specific gravity

    The ratio of a substance’s weight to the weight of an equal volume of water.

  • Tropical depression

    By international agreement, a tropical cyclone with maximum winds that do not exceed 61 kilometers (38 miles) per hour.

  • Umbra

    The central, completely dark part of a shadow produced during an eclipse.

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