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Solutions for Chapter 15.3: Linked genes tend to be inherited together because they are located near each other on the same chromosome

Campbell Biology | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780321775658 | Authors: Jane B. Reece, Lisa A. Urry, Michael L. Cain, Steven A. Wasserman, Peter V. Minorsky, Robert B. Jackson

Full solutions for Campbell Biology | 10th Edition

ISBN: 9780321775658

Campbell Biology | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780321775658 | Authors: Jane B. Reece, Lisa A. Urry, Michael L. Cain, Steven A. Wasserman, Peter V. Minorsky, Robert B. Jackson

Solutions for Chapter 15.3: Linked genes tend to be inherited together because they are located near each other on the same chromosome

Solutions for Chapter 15.3
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Chapter 15.3: Linked genes tend to be inherited together because they are located near each other on the same chromosome includes 3 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 3 problems in chapter 15.3: Linked genes tend to be inherited together because they are located near each other on the same chromosome have been answered, more than 18020 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Campbell Biology was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321775658. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Campbell Biology, edition: 10.

Key Science Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Air mass

    A large body of air that is characterized by a sameness of temperature and humidity.

  • Asteroids

    Thousands of small planetlike bodies, ranging in size from a few hundred kilometers to less than a kilometer, whose orbits lie mainly between those of Mars and Jupiter.

  • Atomic weight

    The average of the atomic masses of isotopes for a given element.

  • Coma

    The fuzzy, gaseous component of a comet’s head.

  • Continental rise

    The gently sloping surface at the base of the continental slope.

  • Crater

    The depression at the summit of a volcano, or that which is produced by a meteorite impact.

  • Declination (stellar)

    The angular distance north or south of the celestial equator denoting the position of a celestial body.

  • Dune

    A hill or ridge of wind-deposited sand.

  • Evolution (Theory of)

    A fundamental theory in biology and paleontology that sets forth the process by which members of a population of organisms come to differ from their ancestors. Organisms evolve by means of mutations, natural selection, and genetic factors. Modern species are descended from related but different species that lived in earlier times.

  • Food chain

    A succession of organisms in an ecological community through which food energy is transferred from producers through herbivores and on to one or more carnivores.

  • Ground moraine

    An undulating layer of till deposited as the ice front retreats.

  • Hydrogen fusion

    The nuclear reaction in which hydrogen nuclei are fused into helium nuclei.

  • Meteorite

    Any portion of a meteoroid that survives its traverse through Earth’s atmosphere and strikes Earth’s surface.

  • Photochemical reaction

    A chemical reaction in the atmosphere that is triggered by sunlight, often yielding a secondary pollutant.

  • Photosphere

    The region of the Sun that radiates energy to space. The visible surface of the Sun.

  • Santa Ana

    The local name given a chinook wind in southern California.

  • Sun are striking either the

    Tropic of Cancer or the Tropic of Capricorn. Solstice represents the longest or shortest day (length of daylight) of the year.

  • Travertine

    A form of limestone that is deposited by hot springs or as a cave deposit.

  • Volcanic island arc

    A chain of volcanic islands generally located a few hundred kilometers from a trench where active subduction of one oceanic slab beneath another is occurring.

  • Westerlies

    The dominant west-to-east motion of the atmosphere that characterizes the regions on the poleward side of the subtropical highs.

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