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Solutions for Chapter 53.4: Life history traits are products of natural selection

Campbell Biology | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780321775658 | Authors: Jane B. Reece, Lisa A. Urry, Michael L. Cain, Steven A. Wasserman, Peter V. Minorsky, Robert B. Jackson

Full solutions for Campbell Biology | 10th Edition

ISBN: 9780321775658

Campbell Biology | 10th Edition | ISBN: 9780321775658 | Authors: Jane B. Reece, Lisa A. Urry, Michael L. Cain, Steven A. Wasserman, Peter V. Minorsky, Robert B. Jackson

Solutions for Chapter 53.4: Life history traits are products of natural selection

Solutions for Chapter 53.4
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Chapter 53.4: Life history traits are products of natural selection includes 3 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Campbell Biology, edition: 10. Since 3 problems in chapter 53.4: Life history traits are products of natural selection have been answered, more than 18108 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Campbell Biology was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321775658.

Key Science Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Closed system

    A system that is self-contained with regards to matter—that is, no matter enters or leaves.

  • Conditional instability

    Moist air with a lapse rate between the dry and wet adiabatic rates.

  • Conglomerate

    A sedimentary rock composed of rounded, gravel-size particles.

  • Continental drift

    A theory that originally proposed that the continents are rafted about. It has essentially been replaced by the plate tectonics theory.

  • Degenerate matter

    Extremely dense solar material caused by electrons being displaced inward toward an atom’s nucleus.

  • Diffused light

    Solar energy scattered and reflected in the atmosphere that reaches Earth’s surface in the form of diffuse blue light from the sky.

  • Frontal wedging

    Lifting of air resulting when cool air acts as a barrier over which warmer, lighter air will rise.

  • Geothermal gradient

    The gradual increase in temperature with depth in the crust. The average is 30° C per kilometer in the upper crust.

  • Glacial erratic

    An ice-transported boulder that was not derived from bedrock near its present site.

  • Hogback

    A narrow, sharp-crested ridge formed by the upturned edge of a steeply dipping bed of resistant rock.

  • Massive

    An igneous pluton that is not tabular in shape.

  • Monocline

    A one-limbed flexure in strata. The strata are unusually flat-lying or very gently dipping on both sides of the monocline.

  • Pressure tendency

    The nature of the change in atmospheric pressure over the past several hours. It can be a useful aid in short range weather prediction.

  • Pulsating variable

    A variable star that pulsates in size and luminosity.

  • Slip face

    The steep, leeward slope of a sand dune; it maintains an angle of about 34 degrees.

  • Soil horizon

    A layer of soil that has identifiable characteristics produced by chemical weathering and other soil-forming processes.

  • Stable air

    Air that resists vertical displacement. If it is lifted, adiabatic cooling will cause its temperature to be lower than the surrounding environment; if it is allowed, it will sink to its original position.

  • Supersaturation

    The condition of being more highly concentrated than is normally possible under given temperature and pressure conditions. When describing humidity, it refers to a relative humidity that is greater than 100 percent.

  • Thermal metamorphism

    See Contact metamorphism.

  • Wave of oscillation

    A water wave in which the wave form advances as the water particles move in circular orbits.

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