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Solutions for Chapter 5: Special Probability Distributions

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321807090 | Authors: Irwin Miller

Full solutions for Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780321807090

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780321807090 | Authors: Irwin Miller

Solutions for Chapter 5: Special Probability Distributions

Solutions for Chapter 5
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Chapter 5: Special Probability Distributions includes 1 full step-by-step solutions. Since 1 problems in chapter 5: Special Probability Distributions have been answered, more than 292 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications, edition: 8. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Mathematical Statistics with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321807090.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    A method of decomposing the total variability in a set of observations, as measured by the sum of the squares of these observations from their average, into component sums of squares that are associated with speciic deined sources of variation

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Backward elimination

    A method of variable selection in regression that begins with all of the candidate regressor variables in the model and eliminates the insigniicant regressors one at a time until only signiicant regressors remain

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Categorical data

    Data consisting of counts or observations that can be classiied into categories. The categories may be descriptive.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Consistent estimator

    An estimator that converges in probability to the true value of the estimated parameter as the sample size increases.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Crossed factors

    Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Designed experiment

    An experiment in which the tests are planned in advance and the plans usually incorporate statistical models. See Experiment

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Factorial experiment

    A type of experimental design in which every level of one factor is tested in combination with every level of another factor. In general, in a factorial experiment, all possible combinations of factor levels are tested.

  • Fisher’s least signiicant difference (LSD) method

    A series of pair-wise hypothesis tests of treatment means in an experiment to determine which means differ.

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .

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