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Solutions for Chapter 24: ComparingMeans

Stats: Modeling The World | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780131359581 | Authors: David E. Bock

Full solutions for Stats: Modeling The World | 3rd Edition

ISBN: 9780131359581

Stats: Modeling The World | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780131359581 | Authors: David E. Bock

Solutions for Chapter 24: ComparingMeans

Solutions for Chapter 24
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Textbook: Stats: Modeling The World
Edition: 3
Author: David E. Bock
ISBN: 9780131359581

Chapter 24: ComparingMeans includes 38 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Stats: Modeling The World , edition: 3. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 38 problems in chapter 24: ComparingMeans have been answered, more than 44842 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Stats: Modeling The World was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780131359581.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • `-error (or `-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by rejecting a null hypothesis when it is actually true (also called a type I error).

  • Acceptance region

    In hypothesis testing, a region in the sample space of the test statistic such that if the test statistic falls within it, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. This terminology is used because rejection of H0 is always a strong conclusion and acceptance of H0 is generally a weak conclusion

  • Attribute

    A qualitative characteristic of an item or unit, usually arising in quality control. For example, classifying production units as defective or nondefective results in attributes data.

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Chi-square test

    Any test of signiicance based on the chi-square distribution. The most common chi-square tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variance or standard deviation of a normal distribution and (2) testing goodness of it of a theoretical distribution to sample data

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Control limits

    See Control chart.

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Distribution function

    Another name for a cumulative distribution function.

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Frequency distribution

    An arrangement of the frequencies of observations in a sample or population according to the values that the observations take on

  • Gamma random variable

    A random variable that generalizes an Erlang random variable to noninteger values of the parameter r

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

  • Harmonic mean

    The harmonic mean of a set of data values is the reciprocal of the arithmetic mean of the reciprocals of the data values; that is, h n x i n i = ? ? ? ? ? = ? ? 1 1 1 1 g .