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Solutions for Chapter 4: Supplementary Exercises

Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9781305251809 | Authors: Jay L. Devore

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9781305251809

Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9781305251809 | Authors: Jay L. Devore

Solutions for Chapter 4: Supplementary Exercises

Solutions for Chapter 4
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Textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences
Edition: 9
Author: Jay L. Devore
ISBN: 9781305251809

Chapter 4: Supplementary Exercises includes 159 full step-by-step solutions. Since 159 problems in chapter 4: Supplementary Exercises have been answered, more than 98892 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences, edition: 9. Probability and Statistics for Engineering and the Sciences was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781305251809.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Conditional probability density function

    The probability density function of the conditional probability distribution of a continuous random variable.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Eficiency

    A concept in parameter estimation that uses the variances of different estimators; essentially, an estimator is more eficient than another estimator if it has smaller variance. When estimators are biased, the concept requires modiication.

  • Enumerative study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to the population. See Analytic study

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

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