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Solutions for Chapter 1: First Course in Probability 8th Edition

First Course in Probability | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780136033134 | Authors: Norman S. Nise

Full solutions for First Course in Probability | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780136033134

First Course in Probability | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780136033134 | Authors: Norman S. Nise

Solutions for Chapter 1

Solutions for Chapter 1
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Textbook: First Course in Probability
Edition: 8
Author: Norman S. Nise
ISBN: 9780136033134

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: First Course in Probability, edition: 8. Since 33 problems in chapter 1 have been answered, more than 6838 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. First Course in Probability was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780136033134. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 1 includes 33 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k factorial experiment.

    A full factorial experiment with k factors and all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each.

  • Additivity property of x 2

    If two independent random variables X1 and X2 are distributed as chi-square with v1 and v2 degrees of freedom, respectively, Y = + X X 1 2 is a chi-square random variable with u = + v v 1 2 degrees of freedom. This generalizes to any number of independent chi-square random variables.

  • Analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    A method of decomposing the total variability in a set of observations, as measured by the sum of the squares of these observations from their average, into component sums of squares that are associated with speciic deined sources of variation

  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • Cause-and-effect diagram

    A chart used to organize the various potential causes of a problem. Also called a ishbone diagram.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Covariance

    A measure of association between two random variables obtained as the expected value of the product of the two random variables around their means; that is, Cov(X Y, ) [( )( )] =? ? E X Y ? ? X Y .

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Cumulative normal distribution function

    The cumulative distribution of the standard normal distribution, often denoted as ?( ) x and tabulated in Appendix Table II.

  • Curvilinear regression

    An expression sometimes used for nonlinear regression models or polynomial regression models.

  • Defect

    Used in statistical quality control, a defect is a particular type of nonconformance to speciications or requirements. Sometimes defects are classiied into types, such as appearance defects and functional defects.

  • Degrees of freedom.

    The number of independent comparisons that can be made among the elements of a sample. The term is analogous to the number of degrees of freedom for an object in a dynamic system, which is the number of independent coordinates required to determine the motion of the object.

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Distribution function

    Another name for a cumulative distribution function.

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

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