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Solutions for Chapter 5: Summarizing Bivariate Data

Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW) | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780495118732 | Authors: Roxy Peck, Chris Olsen, Jay L. Devore

Full solutions for Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW) | 3rd Edition

ISBN: 9780495118732

Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW) | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780495118732 | Authors: Roxy Peck, Chris Olsen, Jay L. Devore

Solutions for Chapter 5: Summarizing Bivariate Data

Solutions for Chapter 5
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Textbook: Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW)
Edition: 3
Author: Roxy Peck, Chris Olsen, Jay L. Devore
ISBN: 9780495118732

Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW) was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780495118732. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 5: Summarizing Bivariate Data includes 86 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Introduction to Statistics and Data Analysis (with CengageNOW Printed Access Card) (Available Titles CengageNOW), edition: 3. Since 86 problems in chapter 5: Summarizing Bivariate Data have been answered, more than 69224 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Attribute control chart

    Any control chart for a discrete random variable. See Variables control chart.

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Cumulative normal distribution function

    The cumulative distribution of the standard normal distribution, often denoted as ?( ) x and tabulated in Appendix Table II.

  • Defect concentration diagram

    A quality tool that graphically shows the location of defects on a part or in a process.

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • Forward selection

    A method of variable selection in regression, where variables are inserted one at a time into the model until no other variables that contribute signiicantly to the model can be found.

  • Frequency distribution

    An arrangement of the frequencies of observations in a sample or population according to the values that the observations take on

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

  • Goodness of fit

    In general, the agreement of a set of observed values and a set of theoretical values that depend on some hypothesis. The term is often used in itting a theoretical distribution to a set of observations.