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Solutions for Chapter 1: Looking at DataDistributions

Introduction to the Practice of Statistics: w/CrunchIt/EESEE Access Card | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781464158933 | Authors: David S. Moore, George P. McCabe, Bruce A. Craig

Full solutions for Introduction to the Practice of Statistics: w/CrunchIt/EESEE Access Card | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9781464158933

Introduction to the Practice of Statistics: w/CrunchIt/EESEE Access Card | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9781464158933 | Authors: David S. Moore, George P. McCabe, Bruce A. Craig

Solutions for Chapter 1: Looking at DataDistributions

Solutions for Chapter 1
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Textbook: Introduction to the Practice of Statistics: w/CrunchIt/EESEE Access Card
Edition: 8
Author: David S. Moore, George P. McCabe, Bruce A. Craig
ISBN: 9781464158933

Since 177 problems in chapter 1: Looking at DataDistributions have been answered, more than 50664 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 1: Looking at DataDistributions includes 177 full step-by-step solutions. Introduction to the Practice of Statistics: w/CrunchIt/EESEE Access Card was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781464158933. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Introduction to the Practice of Statistics: w/CrunchIt/EESEE Access Card, edition: 8.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k p - factorial experiment

    A fractional factorial experiment with k factors tested in a 2 ? p fraction with all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each

  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Average run length, or ARL

    The average number of samples taken in a process monitoring or inspection scheme until the scheme signals that the process is operating at a level different from the level in which it began.

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Conditional probability mass function

    The probability mass function of the conditional probability distribution of a discrete random variable.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Control limits

    See Control chart.

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Curvilinear regression

    An expression sometimes used for nonlinear regression models or polynomial regression models.

  • Discrete uniform random variable

    A discrete random variable with a inite range and constant probability mass function.

  • Distribution function

    Another name for a cumulative distribution function.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • Factorial experiment

    A type of experimental design in which every level of one factor is tested in combination with every level of another factor. In general, in a factorial experiment, all possible combinations of factor levels are tested.

  • Fraction defective control chart

    See P chart

  • Geometric mean.

    The geometric mean of a set of n positive data values is the nth root of the product of the data values; that is, g x i n i n = ( ) = / w 1 1 .

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .