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Solutions for Chapter 11.9: Linear Statistical Models

Probability and Statistics | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321500465 | Authors: Morris H. DeGroot, Mark J. Schervish

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780321500465

Probability and Statistics | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321500465 | Authors: Morris H. DeGroot, Mark J. Schervish

Solutions for Chapter 11.9: Linear Statistical Models

Solutions for Chapter 11.9
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Textbook: Probability and Statistics
Edition: 4
Author: Morris H. DeGroot, Mark J. Schervish
ISBN: 9780321500465

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics, edition: 4. Probability and Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321500465. Since 24 problems in chapter 11.9: Linear Statistical Models have been answered, more than 15867 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 11.9: Linear Statistical Models includes 24 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • `-error (or `-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by rejecting a null hypothesis when it is actually true (also called a type I error).

  • Acceptance region

    In hypothesis testing, a region in the sample space of the test statistic such that if the test statistic falls within it, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. This terminology is used because rejection of H0 is always a strong conclusion and acceptance of H0 is generally a weak conclusion

  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Attribute

    A qualitative characteristic of an item or unit, usually arising in quality control. For example, classifying production units as defective or nondefective results in attributes data.

  • Axioms of probability

    A set of rules that probabilities deined on a sample space must follow. See Probability

  • Block

    In experimental design, a group of experimental units or material that is relatively homogeneous. The purpose of dividing experimental units into blocks is to produce an experimental design wherein variability within blocks is smaller than variability between blocks. This allows the factors of interest to be compared in an environment that has less variability than in an unblocked experiment.

  • Central composite design (CCD)

    A second-order response surface design in k variables consisting of a two-level factorial, 2k axial runs, and one or more center points. The two-level factorial portion of a CCD can be a fractional factorial design when k is large. The CCD is the most widely used design for itting a second-order model.

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Covariance matrix

    A square matrix that contains the variances and covariances among a set of random variables, say, X1 , X X 2 k , , … . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are the variances of the random variables and the off-diagonal elements are the covariances between Xi and Xj . Also called the variance-covariance matrix. When the random variables are standardized to have unit variances, the covariance matrix becomes the correlation matrix.

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Degrees of freedom.

    The number of independent comparisons that can be made among the elements of a sample. The term is analogous to the number of degrees of freedom for an object in a dynamic system, which is the number of independent coordinates required to determine the motion of the object.

  • Deming

    W. Edwards Deming (1900–1993) was a leader in the use of statistical quality control.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

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