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Textbooks / Statistics / Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists 4

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists 4th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827045 | Authors: Anthony J. Hayter

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9781111827045

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827045 | Authors: Anthony J. Hayter

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition - Solutions by Chapter

Since problems from 17 chapters in Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists have been answered, more than 19934 students have viewed full step-by-step answer. The full step-by-step solution to problem in Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists were answered by , our top Statistics solution expert on 01/12/18, 03:07PM. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781111827045. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters: 17. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, edition: 4.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Acceptance region

    In hypothesis testing, a region in the sample space of the test statistic such that if the test statistic falls within it, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. This terminology is used because rejection of H0 is always a strong conclusion and acceptance of H0 is generally a weak conclusion

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Distribution function

    Another name for a cumulative distribution function.

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model