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Solutions for Chapter 10: Discrete Data Analysis

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827045 | Authors: Anthony J. Hayter

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9781111827045

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827045 | Authors: Anthony J. Hayter

Solutions for Chapter 10: Discrete Data Analysis

Solutions for Chapter 10
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Textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists
Edition: 4
Author: Anthony J. Hayter
ISBN: 9781111827045

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 94 problems in chapter 10: Discrete Data Analysis have been answered, more than 13673 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781111827045. Chapter 10: Discrete Data Analysis includes 94 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, edition: 4.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k p - factorial experiment

    A fractional factorial experiment with k factors tested in a 2 ? p fraction with all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each

  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Binomial random variable

    A discrete random variable that equals the number of successes in a ixed number of Bernoulli trials.

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conditional probability density function

    The probability density function of the conditional probability distribution of a continuous random variable.

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Discrete distribution

    A probability distribution for a discrete random variable

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

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