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Solutions for Chapter 17: Reliability Analysis and Life Testing

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827045 | Authors: Anthony J. Hayter

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9781111827045

Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9781111827045 | Authors: Anthony J. Hayter

Solutions for Chapter 17: Reliability Analysis and Life Testing

Solutions for Chapter 17
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Textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists
Edition: 4
Author: Anthony J. Hayter
ISBN: 9781111827045

Chapter 17: Reliability Analysis and Life Testing includes 28 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781111827045. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics for Engineers and Scientists, edition: 4. Since 28 problems in chapter 17: Reliability Analysis and Life Testing have been answered, more than 11778 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Continuous uniform random variable

    A continuous random variable with range of a inite interval and a constant probability density function.

  • Correction factor

    A term used for the quantity ( / )( ) 1 1 2 n xi i n ? = that is subtracted from xi i n 2 ? =1 to give the corrected sum of squares deined as (/ ) ( ) 1 1 2 n xx i x i n ? = i ? . The correction factor can also be written as nx 2 .

  • Covariance

    A measure of association between two random variables obtained as the expected value of the product of the two random variables around their means; that is, Cov(X Y, ) [( )( )] =? ? E X Y ? ? X Y .

  • Cumulative distribution function

    For a random variable X, the function of X deined as PX x ( ) ? that is used to specify the probability distribution.

  • Cumulative normal distribution function

    The cumulative distribution of the standard normal distribution, often denoted as ?( ) x and tabulated in Appendix Table II.

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Discrete distribution

    A probability distribution for a discrete random variable

  • Discrete random variable

    A random variable with a inite (or countably ininite) range.

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .

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