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Solutions for Chapter 6-3: The Central Limit Theorem

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780073386102

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Solutions for Chapter 6-3: The Central Limit Theorem

Solutions for Chapter 6-3
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Textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed.
Edition: 8
Author: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus
ISBN: 9780073386102

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed., edition: 8. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073386102. Chapter 6-3: The Central Limit Theorem includes 30 full step-by-step solutions. Since 30 problems in chapter 6-3: The Central Limit Theorem have been answered, more than 27665 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Binomial random variable

    A discrete random variable that equals the number of successes in a ixed number of Bernoulli trials.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Chi-square (or chi-squared) random variable

    A continuous random variable that results from the sum of squares of independent standard normal random variables. It is a special case of a gamma random variable.

  • Chi-square test

    Any test of signiicance based on the chi-square distribution. The most common chi-square tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variance or standard deviation of a normal distribution and (2) testing goodness of it of a theoretical distribution to sample data

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Comparative experiment

    An experiment in which the treatments (experimental conditions) that are to be studied are included in the experiment. The data from the experiment are used to evaluate the treatments.

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Defects-per-unit control chart

    See U chart

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Eficiency

    A concept in parameter estimation that uses the variances of different estimators; essentially, an estimator is more eficient than another estimator if it has smaller variance. When estimators are biased, the concept requires modiication.

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • Exponential random variable

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • Fisher’s least signiicant difference (LSD) method

    A series of pair-wise hypothesis tests of treatment means in an experiment to determine which means differ.

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications

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