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Solutions for Chapter 7-4: Confidence Intervals for Variances and Standard Deviations

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780073386102

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Solutions for Chapter 7-4: Confidence Intervals for Variances and Standard Deviations

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073386102. Since 13 problems in chapter 7-4: Confidence Intervals for Variances and Standard Deviations have been answered, more than 34075 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 7-4: Confidence Intervals for Variances and Standard Deviations includes 13 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed., edition: 8.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Additivity property of x 2

    If two independent random variables X1 and X2 are distributed as chi-square with v1 and v2 degrees of freedom, respectively, Y = + X X 1 2 is a chi-square random variable with u = + v v 1 2 degrees of freedom. This generalizes to any number of independent chi-square random variables.

  • Analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    A method of decomposing the total variability in a set of observations, as measured by the sum of the squares of these observations from their average, into component sums of squares that are associated with speciic deined sources of variation

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Backward elimination

    A method of variable selection in regression that begins with all of the candidate regressor variables in the model and eliminates the insigniicant regressors one at a time until only signiicant regressors remain

  • Chi-square test

    Any test of signiicance based on the chi-square distribution. The most common chi-square tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variance or standard deviation of a normal distribution and (2) testing goodness of it of a theoretical distribution to sample data

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Continuous distribution

    A probability distribution for a continuous random variable.

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Correction factor

    A term used for the quantity ( / )( ) 1 1 2 n xi i n ? = that is subtracted from xi i n 2 ? =1 to give the corrected sum of squares deined as (/ ) ( ) 1 1 2 n xx i x i n ? = i ? . The correction factor can also be written as nx 2 .

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Fraction defective control chart

    See P chart

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

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