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Solutions for Chapter 10-2: Regression

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780073386102

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Solutions for Chapter 10-2: Regression

Solutions for Chapter 10-2
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Textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed.
Edition: 8
Author: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus
ISBN: 9780073386102

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073386102. Since 38 problems in chapter 10-2: Regression have been answered, more than 37120 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 10-2: Regression includes 38 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed., edition: 8.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k p - factorial experiment

    A fractional factorial experiment with k factors tested in a 2 ? p fraction with all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Conditional variance.

    The variance of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Defect

    Used in statistical quality control, a defect is a particular type of nonconformance to speciications or requirements. Sometimes defects are classiied into types, such as appearance defects and functional defects.

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Design matrix

    A matrix that provides the tests that are to be conducted in an experiment.

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

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