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Solutions for Chapter 10: Review Execises

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780073386102

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Solutions for Chapter 10: Review Execises

Solutions for Chapter 10
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Textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed.
Edition: 8
Author: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus
ISBN: 9780073386102

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed., edition: 8. Chapter 10: Review Execises includes 28 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 28 problems in chapter 10: Review Execises have been answered, more than 34066 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073386102.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Attribute control chart

    Any control chart for a discrete random variable. See Variables control chart.

  • Block

    In experimental design, a group of experimental units or material that is relatively homogeneous. The purpose of dividing experimental units into blocks is to produce an experimental design wherein variability within blocks is smaller than variability between blocks. This allows the factors of interest to be compared in an environment that has less variability than in an unblocked experiment.

  • Chi-square test

    Any test of signiicance based on the chi-square distribution. The most common chi-square tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variance or standard deviation of a normal distribution and (2) testing goodness of it of a theoretical distribution to sample data

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Comparative experiment

    An experiment in which the treatments (experimental conditions) that are to be studied are included in the experiment. The data from the experiment are used to evaluate the treatments.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conditional probability

    The probability of an event given that the random experiment produces an outcome in another event.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Contour plot

    A two-dimensional graphic used for a bivariate probability density function that displays curves for which the probability density function is constant.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Degrees of freedom.

    The number of independent comparisons that can be made among the elements of a sample. The term is analogous to the number of degrees of freedom for an object in a dynamic system, which is the number of independent coordinates required to determine the motion of the object.

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Designed experiment

    An experiment in which the tests are planned in advance and the plans usually incorporate statistical models. See Experiment

  • Error sum of squares

    In analysis of variance, this is the portion of total variability that is due to the random component in the data. It is usually based on replication of observations at certain treatment combinations in the experiment. It is sometimes called the residual sum of squares, although this is really a better term to use only when the sum of squares is based on the remnants of a model-itting process and not on replication.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

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