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Solutions for Chapter 14-1: Common Sampling Techniques

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Full solutions for Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition

ISBN: 9780073386102

Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. | 8th Edition | ISBN: 9780073386102 | Authors: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus

Solutions for Chapter 14-1: Common Sampling Techniques

Solutions for Chapter 14-1
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Textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed.
Edition: 8
Author: Allan G Bluman Professor Emeritus
ISBN: 9780073386102

Since 20 problems in chapter 14-1: Common Sampling Techniques have been answered, more than 31553 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed., edition: 8. Elementary Statistics: A Step by Step Approach 8th ed. was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073386102. Chapter 14-1: Common Sampling Techniques includes 20 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k p - factorial experiment

    A fractional factorial experiment with k factors tested in a 2 ? p fraction with all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Categorical data

    Data consisting of counts or observations that can be classiied into categories. The categories may be descriptive.

  • Chi-square (or chi-squared) random variable

    A continuous random variable that results from the sum of squares of independent standard normal random variables. It is a special case of a gamma random variable.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Correction factor

    A term used for the quantity ( / )( ) 1 1 2 n xi i n ? = that is subtracted from xi i n 2 ? =1 to give the corrected sum of squares deined as (/ ) ( ) 1 1 2 n xx i x i n ? = i ? . The correction factor can also be written as nx 2 .

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Dependent variable

    The response variable in regression or a designed experiment.

  • Design matrix

    A matrix that provides the tests that are to be conducted in an experiment.

  • Enumerative study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to the population. See Analytic study

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Geometric mean.

    The geometric mean of a set of n positive data values is the nth root of the product of the data values; that is, g x i n i n = ( ) = / w 1 1 .

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .

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