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Solutions for Chapter 3.2: The Exponential Contribution

Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781119285427 | Authors: Kishor S. Trivedi

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781119285427

Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781119285427 | Authors: Kishor S. Trivedi

Solutions for Chapter 3.2: The Exponential Contribution

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications , edition: 2. Since 4 problems in chapter 3.2: The Exponential Contribution have been answered, more than 3152 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 3.2: The Exponential Contribution includes 4 full step-by-step solutions. Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781119285427. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Bayes’ estimator

    An estimator for a parameter obtained from a Bayesian method that uses a prior distribution for the parameter along with the conditional distribution of the data given the parameter to obtain the posterior distribution of the parameter. The estimator is obtained from the posterior distribution.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • Block

    In experimental design, a group of experimental units or material that is relatively homogeneous. The purpose of dividing experimental units into blocks is to produce an experimental design wherein variability within blocks is smaller than variability between blocks. This allows the factors of interest to be compared in an environment that has less variability than in an unblocked experiment.

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Comparative experiment

    An experiment in which the treatments (experimental conditions) that are to be studied are included in the experiment. The data from the experiment are used to evaluate the treatments.

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Discrete distribution

    A probability distribution for a discrete random variable

  • Discrete random variable

    A random variable with a inite (or countably ininite) range.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Fraction defective control chart

    See P chart

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