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Solutions for Chapter 9.1: Intoduction

Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781119285427 | Authors: Kishor S. Trivedi

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781119285427

Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781119285427 | Authors: Kishor S. Trivedi

Solutions for Chapter 9.1: Intoduction

Chapter 9.1: Intoduction includes 4 full step-by-step solutions. Since 4 problems in chapter 9.1: Intoduction have been answered, more than 2236 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications , edition: 2. Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781119285427. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • `-error (or `-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by rejecting a null hypothesis when it is actually true (also called a type I error).

  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Control limits

    See Control chart.

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Covariance matrix

    A square matrix that contains the variances and covariances among a set of random variables, say, X1 , X X 2 k , , … . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are the variances of the random variables and the off-diagonal elements are the covariances between Xi and Xj . Also called the variance-covariance matrix. When the random variables are standardized to have unit variances, the covariance matrix becomes the correlation matrix.

  • Defect

    Used in statistical quality control, a defect is a particular type of nonconformance to speciications or requirements. Sometimes defects are classiied into types, such as appearance defects and functional defects.

  • Defects-per-unit control chart

    See U chart

  • Discrete distribution

    A probability distribution for a discrete random variable

  • Error mean square

    The error sum of squares divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Exhaustive

    A property of a collection of events that indicates that their union equals the sample space.

  • Exponential random variable

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • Geometric mean.

    The geometric mean of a set of n positive data values is the nth root of the product of the data values; that is, g x i n i n = ( ) = / w 1 1 .

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

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