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Solutions for Chapter 10.2.2 : Maximum-Likelihood Estimation

Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781119285427 | Authors: Kishor S. Trivedi

Full solutions for Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition

ISBN: 9781119285427

Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications | 2nd Edition | ISBN: 9781119285427 | Authors: Kishor S. Trivedi

Solutions for Chapter 10.2.2 : Maximum-Likelihood Estimation

Since 4 problems in chapter 10.2.2 : Maximum-Likelihood Estimation have been answered, more than 3291 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 10.2.2 : Maximum-Likelihood Estimation includes 4 full step-by-step solutions. Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781119285427. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistics with Reliability, Queuing, and Computer Science Applications , edition: 2. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Axioms of probability

    A set of rules that probabilities deined on a sample space must follow. See Probability

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Continuous distribution

    A probability distribution for a continuous random variable.

  • Continuous uniform random variable

    A continuous random variable with range of a inite interval and a constant probability density function.

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Discrete random variable

    A random variable with a inite (or countably ininite) range.

  • Discrete uniform random variable

    A discrete random variable with a inite range and constant probability mass function.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Eficiency

    A concept in parameter estimation that uses the variances of different estimators; essentially, an estimator is more eficient than another estimator if it has smaller variance. When estimators are biased, the concept requires modiication.

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

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