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Solutions for Chapter 7.5: Lines and Planes in 3-Space

Advanced Engineering Mathematics | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9781449691721 | Authors: Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright

Full solutions for Advanced Engineering Mathematics | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9781449691721

Advanced Engineering Mathematics | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9781449691721 | Authors: Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright

Solutions for Chapter 7.5: Lines and Planes in 3-Space

Solutions for Chapter 7.5
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Textbook: Advanced Engineering Mathematics
Edition: 5
Author: Dennis G. Zill, Warren S. Wright
ISBN: 9781449691721

Chapter 7.5: Lines and Planes in 3-Space includes 82 full step-by-step solutions. Since 82 problems in chapter 7.5: Lines and Planes in 3-Space have been answered, more than 37456 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Advanced Engineering Mathematics , edition: 5. Advanced Engineering Mathematics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781449691721. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Adjusted R 2

    A variation of the R 2 statistic that compensates for the number of parameters in a regression model. Essentially, the adjustment is a penalty for increasing the number of parameters in the model. Alias. In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • Analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    A method of decomposing the total variability in a set of observations, as measured by the sum of the squares of these observations from their average, into component sums of squares that are associated with speciic deined sources of variation

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Completely randomized design (or experiment)

    A type of experimental design in which the treatments or design factors are assigned to the experimental units in a random manner. In designed experiments, a completely randomized design results from running all of the treatment combinations in random order.

  • Consistent estimator

    An estimator that converges in probability to the true value of the estimated parameter as the sample size increases.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Correction factor

    A term used for the quantity ( / )( ) 1 1 2 n xi i n ? = that is subtracted from xi i n 2 ? =1 to give the corrected sum of squares deined as (/ ) ( ) 1 1 2 n xx i x i n ? = i ? . The correction factor can also be written as nx 2 .

  • Covariance

    A measure of association between two random variables obtained as the expected value of the product of the two random variables around their means; that is, Cov(X Y, ) [( )( )] =? ? E X Y ? ? X Y .

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Crossed factors

    Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Discrete random variable

    A random variable with a inite (or countably ininite) range.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Goodness of fit

    In general, the agreement of a set of observed values and a set of theoretical values that depend on some hypothesis. The term is often used in itting a theoretical distribution to a set of observations.

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