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Solutions for Chapter 16-8: ATTRIBUTE CONTROL CHARTS

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780471204541 | Authors: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger

Full solutions for Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 3rd Edition

ISBN: 9780471204541

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 3rd Edition | ISBN: 9780471204541 | Authors: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger

Solutions for Chapter 16-8: ATTRIBUTE CONTROL CHARTS

Chapter 16-8: ATTRIBUTE CONTROL CHARTS includes 5 full step-by-step solutions. Since 5 problems in chapter 16-8: ATTRIBUTE CONTROL CHARTS have been answered, more than 19936 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780471204541. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers , edition: 3.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • `-error (or `-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by rejecting a null hypothesis when it is actually true (also called a type I error).

  • a-error (or a-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by failing to reject a null hypothesis when it is actually false (also called a type II error).

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Attribute

    A qualitative characteristic of an item or unit, usually arising in quality control. For example, classifying production units as defective or nondefective results in attributes data.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Conditional probability density function

    The probability density function of the conditional probability distribution of a continuous random variable.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Cumulative distribution function

    For a random variable X, the function of X deined as PX x ( ) ? that is used to specify the probability distribution.

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Discrete distribution

    A probability distribution for a discrete random variable

  • Enumerative study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to the population. See Analytic study

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Factorial experiment

    A type of experimental design in which every level of one factor is tested in combination with every level of another factor. In general, in a factorial experiment, all possible combinations of factor levels are tested.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Fraction defective

    In statistical quality control, that portion of a number of units or the output of a process that is defective.

  • Frequency distribution

    An arrangement of the frequencies of observations in a sample or population according to the values that the observations take on

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