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Solutions for Chapter 1: WHOLE NUMBERS

Contemporary Mathematics | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780538481267 | Authors: Robert Brechner

Full solutions for Contemporary Mathematics | 6th Edition

ISBN: 9780538481267

Contemporary Mathematics | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9780538481267 | Authors: Robert Brechner

Solutions for Chapter 1: WHOLE NUMBERS

Solutions for Chapter 1
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Textbook: Contemporary Mathematics
Edition: 6
Author: Robert Brechner
ISBN: 9780538481267

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Contemporary Mathematics, edition: 6. Since 33 problems in chapter 1: WHOLE NUMBERS have been answered, more than 23273 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Contemporary Mathematics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780538481267. Chapter 1: WHOLE NUMBERS includes 33 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Analysis of variance (ANOVA)

    A method of decomposing the total variability in a set of observations, as measured by the sum of the squares of these observations from their average, into component sums of squares that are associated with speciic deined sources of variation

  • Binomial random variable

    A discrete random variable that equals the number of successes in a ixed number of Bernoulli trials.

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Conditional probability mass function

    The probability mass function of the conditional probability distribution of a discrete random variable.

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Contour plot

    A two-dimensional graphic used for a bivariate probability density function that displays curves for which the probability density function is constant.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Cumulative normal distribution function

    The cumulative distribution of the standard normal distribution, often denoted as ?( ) x and tabulated in Appendix Table II.

  • Defect concentration diagram

    A quality tool that graphically shows the location of defects on a part or in a process.

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

  • Harmonic mean

    The harmonic mean of a set of data values is the reciprocal of the arithmetic mean of the reciprocals of the data values; that is, h n x i n i = ? ? ? ? ? = ? ? 1 1 1 1 g .