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Solutions for Chapter 5.6: Small-Sample Confidence Intervals for the Difference Between Two Means

Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401331 | Authors: William Navidi

Full solutions for Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780073401331

Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401331 | Authors: William Navidi

Solutions for Chapter 5.6: Small-Sample Confidence Intervals for the Difference Between Two Means

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Statistics for Engineers and Scientists was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073401331. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics for Engineers and Scientists , edition: 4. Since 15 problems in chapter 5.6: Small-Sample Confidence Intervals for the Difference Between Two Means have been answered, more than 287189 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 5.6: Small-Sample Confidence Intervals for the Difference Between Two Means includes 15 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • `-error (or `-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by rejecting a null hypothesis when it is actually true (also called a type I error).

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Conditional probability mass function

    The probability mass function of the conditional probability distribution of a discrete random variable.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Degrees of freedom.

    The number of independent comparisons that can be made among the elements of a sample. The term is analogous to the number of degrees of freedom for an object in a dynamic system, which is the number of independent coordinates required to determine the motion of the object.

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Discrete uniform random variable

    A discrete random variable with a inite range and constant probability mass function.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Estimate (or point estimate)

    The numerical value of a point estimator.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • Fraction defective

    In statistical quality control, that portion of a number of units or the output of a process that is defective.

  • Fraction defective control chart

    See P chart

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