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Solutions for Chapter 7.2: Statistics for Engineers and Scientists 4th Edition

Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401331 | Authors: William Navidi

Full solutions for Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780073401331

Statistics for Engineers and Scientists | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401331 | Authors: William Navidi

Solutions for Chapter 7.2

Since 13 problems in chapter 7.2 have been answered, more than 291904 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 7.2 includes 13 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics for Engineers and Scientists , edition: 4. Statistics for Engineers and Scientists was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073401331.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Completely randomized design (or experiment)

    A type of experimental design in which the treatments or design factors are assigned to the experimental units in a random manner. In designed experiments, a completely randomized design results from running all of the treatment combinations in random order.

  • Conditional probability density function

    The probability density function of the conditional probability distribution of a continuous random variable.

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Defect concentration diagram

    A quality tool that graphically shows the location of defects on a part or in a process.

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Deming

    W. Edwards Deming (1900–1993) was a leader in the use of statistical quality control.

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Generator

    Effects in a fractional factorial experiment that are used to construct the experimental tests used in the experiment. The generators also deine the aliases.