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Solutions for Chapter 7.2: Interval Estimation

Probability and Statistical Inference | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780321923271 | Authors: Robert V. Hogg, Elliot Tanis, Dale Zimmerman

Full solutions for Probability and Statistical Inference | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780321923271

Probability and Statistical Inference | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780321923271 | Authors: Robert V. Hogg, Elliot Tanis, Dale Zimmerman

Solutions for Chapter 7.2: Interval Estimation

Solutions for Chapter 7.2
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Textbook: Probability and Statistical Inference
Edition: 9
Author: Robert V. Hogg, Elliot Tanis, Dale Zimmerman
ISBN: 9780321923271

Since 27 problems in chapter 7.2: Interval Estimation have been answered, more than 81449 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 7.2: Interval Estimation includes 27 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Probability and Statistical Inference was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321923271. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistical Inference , edition: 9.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Adjusted R 2

    A variation of the R 2 statistic that compensates for the number of parameters in a regression model. Essentially, the adjustment is a penalty for increasing the number of parameters in the model. Alias. In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Chi-square (or chi-squared) random variable

    A continuous random variable that results from the sum of squares of independent standard normal random variables. It is a special case of a gamma random variable.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conditional probability

    The probability of an event given that the random experiment produces an outcome in another event.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Discrete uniform random variable

    A discrete random variable with a inite range and constant probability mass function.

  • Enumerative study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to the population. See Analytic study

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Generator

    Effects in a fractional factorial experiment that are used to construct the experimental tests used in the experiment. The generators also deine the aliases.

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