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Solutions for Chapter 7.5: Interval Estimation

Probability and Statistical Inference | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780321923271 | Authors: Robert V. Hogg, Elliot Tanis, Dale Zimmerman

Full solutions for Probability and Statistical Inference | 9th Edition

ISBN: 9780321923271

Probability and Statistical Inference | 9th Edition | ISBN: 9780321923271 | Authors: Robert V. Hogg, Elliot Tanis, Dale Zimmerman

Solutions for Chapter 7.5: Interval Estimation

Solutions for Chapter 7.5
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Textbook: Probability and Statistical Inference
Edition: 9
Author: Robert V. Hogg, Elliot Tanis, Dale Zimmerman
ISBN: 9780321923271

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Probability and Statistical Inference was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321923271. Chapter 7.5: Interval Estimation includes 24 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Probability and Statistical Inference , edition: 9. Since 24 problems in chapter 7.5: Interval Estimation have been answered, more than 86567 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k factorial experiment.

    A full factorial experiment with k factors and all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each.

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Binomial random variable

    A discrete random variable that equals the number of successes in a ixed number of Bernoulli trials.

  • Categorical data

    Data consisting of counts or observations that can be classiied into categories. The categories may be descriptive.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conditional probability density function

    The probability density function of the conditional probability distribution of a continuous random variable.

  • Continuous distribution

    A probability distribution for a continuous random variable.

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Curvilinear regression

    An expression sometimes used for nonlinear regression models or polynomial regression models.

  • Defect concentration diagram

    A quality tool that graphically shows the location of defects on a part or in a process.

  • Deming

    W. Edwards Deming (1900–1993) was a leader in the use of statistical quality control.

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • Fixed factor (or fixed effect).

    In analysis of variance, a factor or effect is considered ixed if all the levels of interest for that factor are included in the experiment. Conclusions are then valid about this set of levels only, although when the factor is quantitative, it is customary to it a model to the data for interpolating between these levels.

  • Gamma random variable

    A random variable that generalizes an Erlang random variable to noninteger values of the parameter r

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

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