Solutions for Chapter 5: Multivariate Probability Distributions

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780495110811 | Authors: Dennis Wackerly, William Mendenhall Richard L. Scheaffer

Full solutions for Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780495110811

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780495110811 | Authors: Dennis Wackerly, William Mendenhall Richard L. Scheaffer

Solutions for Chapter 5: Multivariate Probability Distributions

Solutions for Chapter 5
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Textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications
Edition: 7th
Author: Dennis Wackerly, William Mendenhall Richard L. Scheaffer
ISBN: 9780495110811

This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 5: Multivariate Probability Distributions includes 151 full step-by-step solutions. Mathematical Statistics with Applications was written by Sieva Kozinsky and is associated to the ISBN: 9780495110811. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications , edition: 7th. Since 151 problems in chapter 5: Multivariate Probability Distributions have been answered, more than 57255 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k p - factorial experiment

    A fractional factorial experiment with k factors tested in a 2 ? p fraction with all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each

  • Alias

    In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • Bayes’ estimator

    An estimator for a parameter obtained from a Bayesian method that uses a prior distribution for the parameter along with the conditional distribution of the data given the parameter to obtain the posterior distribution of the parameter. The estimator is obtained from the posterior distribution.

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Cause-and-effect diagram

    A chart used to organize the various potential causes of a problem. Also called a ishbone diagram.

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Chi-square test

    Any test of signiicance based on the chi-square distribution. The most common chi-square tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variance or standard deviation of a normal distribution and (2) testing goodness of it of a theoretical distribution to sample data

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Continuous distribution

    A probability distribution for a continuous random variable.

  • Contour plot

    A two-dimensional graphic used for a bivariate probability density function that displays curves for which the probability density function is constant.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Design matrix

    A matrix that provides the tests that are to be conducted in an experiment.

  • Discrete uniform random variable

    A discrete random variable with a inite range and constant probability mass function.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Geometric mean.

    The geometric mean of a set of n positive data values is the nth root of the product of the data values; that is, g x i n i n = ( ) = / w 1 1 .

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .

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