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Solutions for Chapter 7: Sampling Distributions and the Central Limit Theorem

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780495110811 | Authors: Dennis Wackerly; William Mendenhall; Richard L. Scheaffer

Full solutions for Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780495110811

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780495110811 | Authors: Dennis Wackerly; William Mendenhall; Richard L. Scheaffer

Solutions for Chapter 7: Sampling Distributions and the Central Limit Theorem

Solutions for Chapter 7
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Textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications
Edition: 7
Author: Dennis Wackerly; William Mendenhall; Richard L. Scheaffer
ISBN: 9780495110811

Since 95 problems in chapter 7: Sampling Distributions and the Central Limit Theorem have been answered, more than 129765 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Chapter 7: Sampling Distributions and the Central Limit Theorem includes 95 full step-by-step solutions. Mathematical Statistics with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780495110811. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications , edition: 7.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alias

    In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • Arithmetic mean

    The arithmetic mean of a set of numbers x1 , x2 ,…, xn is their sum divided by the number of observations, or ( / )1 1 n xi t n ? = . The arithmetic mean is usually denoted by x , and is often called the average

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Attribute control chart

    Any control chart for a discrete random variable. See Variables control chart.

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Comparative experiment

    An experiment in which the treatments (experimental conditions) that are to be studied are included in the experiment. The data from the experiment are used to evaluate the treatments.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Deining relation

    A subset of effects in a fractional factorial design that deine the aliases in the design.

  • Density function

    Another name for a probability density function

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • Fisher’s least signiicant difference (LSD) method

    A series of pair-wise hypothesis tests of treatment means in an experiment to determine which means differ.

  • Fractional factorial experiment

    A type of factorial experiment in which not all possible treatment combinations are run. This is usually done to reduce the size of an experiment with several factors.

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