Solutions for Chapter 14: Analysis of Categorical Data

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780495110811 | Authors: Dennis Wackerly, William Mendenhall Richard L. Scheaffer

Full solutions for Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition

ISBN: 9780495110811

Mathematical Statistics with Applications | 7th Edition | ISBN: 9780495110811 | Authors: Dennis Wackerly, William Mendenhall Richard L. Scheaffer

Solutions for Chapter 14: Analysis of Categorical Data

Solutions for Chapter 14
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Textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications
Edition: 7th
Author: Dennis Wackerly, William Mendenhall Richard L. Scheaffer
ISBN: 9780495110811

Mathematical Statistics with Applications was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780495110811. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Mathematical Statistics with Applications , edition: 7th. Since 37 problems in chapter 14: Analysis of Categorical Data have been answered, more than 80597 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter 14: Analysis of Categorical Data includes 37 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Attribute control chart

    Any control chart for a discrete random variable. See Variables control chart.

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Block

    In experimental design, a group of experimental units or material that is relatively homogeneous. The purpose of dividing experimental units into blocks is to produce an experimental design wherein variability within blocks is smaller than variability between blocks. This allows the factors of interest to be compared in an environment that has less variability than in an unblocked experiment.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Chi-square (or chi-squared) random variable

    A continuous random variable that results from the sum of squares of independent standard normal random variables. It is a special case of a gamma random variable.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Continuous distribution

    A probability distribution for a continuous random variable.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Correlation

    In the most general usage, a measure of the interdependence among data. The concept may include more than two variables. The term is most commonly used in a narrow sense to express the relationship between quantitative variables or ranks.

  • Eficiency

    A concept in parameter estimation that uses the variances of different estimators; essentially, an estimator is more eficient than another estimator if it has smaller variance. When estimators are biased, the concept requires modiication.

  • Error sum of squares

    In analysis of variance, this is the portion of total variability that is due to the random component in the data. It is usually based on replication of observations at certain treatment combinations in the experiment. It is sometimes called the residual sum of squares, although this is really a better term to use only when the sum of squares is based on the remnants of a model-itting process and not on replication.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Extra sum of squares method

    A method used in regression analysis to conduct a hypothesis test for the additional contribution of one or more variables to a model.

  • Fisher’s least signiicant difference (LSD) method

    A series of pair-wise hypothesis tests of treatment means in an experiment to determine which means differ.

  • Fraction defective control chart

    See P chart

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

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