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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 11: Two-Sample Tests of Hypothesis

Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401805 | Authors: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen

Full solutions for Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition

ISBN: 9780073401805

Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401805 | Authors: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 11: Two-Sample Tests of Hypothesis

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 11
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Textbook: Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics
Edition: 15
Author: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen
ISBN: 9780073401805

Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073401805. Chapter Chapter 11: Two-Sample Tests of Hypothesis includes 63 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics, edition: 15. Since 63 problems in chapter Chapter 11: Two-Sample Tests of Hypothesis have been answered, more than 16636 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Acceptance region

    In hypothesis testing, a region in the sample space of the test statistic such that if the test statistic falls within it, the null hypothesis cannot be rejected. This terminology is used because rejection of H0 is always a strong conclusion and acceptance of H0 is generally a weak conclusion

  • Categorical data

    Data consisting of counts or observations that can be classiied into categories. The categories may be descriptive.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Correction factor

    A term used for the quantity ( / )( ) 1 1 2 n xi i n ? = that is subtracted from xi i n 2 ? =1 to give the corrected sum of squares deined as (/ ) ( ) 1 1 2 n xx i x i n ? = i ? . The correction factor can also be written as nx 2 .

  • Correlation

    In the most general usage, a measure of the interdependence among data. The concept may include more than two variables. The term is most commonly used in a narrow sense to express the relationship between quantitative variables or ranks.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Designed experiment

    An experiment in which the tests are planned in advance and the plans usually incorporate statistical models. See Experiment

  • Discrete distribution

    A probability distribution for a discrete random variable

  • Enumerative study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to the population. See Analytic study

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Exhaustive

    A property of a collection of events that indicates that their union equals the sample space.

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • F-test

    Any test of signiicance involving the F distribution. The most common F-tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variances or standard deviations of two independent normal distributions, (2) testing hypotheses about treatment means or variance components in the analysis of variance, and (3) testing signiicance of regression or tests on subsets of parameters in a regression model.

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

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