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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 19: Statistical Process Control and Quality Management

Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401805 | Authors: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen

Full solutions for Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition

ISBN: 9780073401805

Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics | 15th Edition | ISBN: 9780073401805 | Authors: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 19: Statistical Process Control and Quality Management

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 19
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Textbook: Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics
Edition: 15
Author: Douglas Lind, William Marchal, Samuel Wathen
ISBN: 9780073401805

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics, edition: 15. Since 38 problems in chapter Chapter 19: Statistical Process Control and Quality Management have been answered, more than 27347 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter Chapter 19: Statistical Process Control and Quality Management includes 38 full step-by-step solutions. Statistical Techniques in Business and Economics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780073401805.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Central tendency

    The tendency of data to cluster around some value. Central tendency is usually expressed by a measure of location such as the mean, median, or mode.

  • Chi-square (or chi-squared) random variable

    A continuous random variable that results from the sum of squares of independent standard normal random variables. It is a special case of a gamma random variable.

  • Conditional probability

    The probability of an event given that the random experiment produces an outcome in another event.

  • Consistent estimator

    An estimator that converges in probability to the true value of the estimated parameter as the sample size increases.

  • Continuous distribution

    A probability distribution for a continuous random variable.

  • Continuous random variable.

    A random variable with an interval (either inite or ininite) of real numbers for its range.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Critical value(s)

    The value of a statistic corresponding to a stated signiicance level as determined from the sampling distribution. For example, if PZ z PZ ( )( .) . ? =? = 0 025 . 1 96 0 025, then z0 025 . = 1 9. 6 is the critical value of z at the 0.025 level of signiicance. Crossed factors. Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Crossed factors

    Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Degrees of freedom.

    The number of independent comparisons that can be made among the elements of a sample. The term is analogous to the number of degrees of freedom for an object in a dynamic system, which is the number of independent coordinates required to determine the motion of the object.

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Forward selection

    A method of variable selection in regression, where variables are inserted one at a time into the model until no other variables that contribute signiicantly to the model can be found.

  • Fraction defective control chart

    See P chart

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