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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 7: Exploring Data: Part I Review

Full solutions for The Basic Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780716774785

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 7: Exploring Data: Part I Review

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 7
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Textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics
Edition: 4
Author: David S. Moore
ISBN: 9780716774785

The Basic Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716774785. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics, edition: 4. Since 52 problems in chapter Chapter 7: Exploring Data: Part I Review have been answered, more than 7733 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Chapter Chapter 7: Exploring Data: Part I Review includes 52 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Cause-and-effect diagram

    A chart used to organize the various potential causes of a problem. Also called a ishbone diagram.

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Correlation

    In the most general usage, a measure of the interdependence among data. The concept may include more than two variables. The term is most commonly used in a narrow sense to express the relationship between quantitative variables or ranks.

  • Cumulative normal distribution function

    The cumulative distribution of the standard normal distribution, often denoted as ?( ) x and tabulated in Appendix Table II.

  • Cumulative sum control chart (CUSUM)

    A control chart in which the point plotted at time t is the sum of the measured deviations from target for all statistics up to time t

  • Design matrix

    A matrix that provides the tests that are to be conducted in an experiment.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Erlang random variable

    A continuous random variable that is the sum of a ixed number of independent, exponential random variables.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Factorial experiment

    A type of experimental design in which every level of one factor is tested in combination with every level of another factor. In general, in a factorial experiment, all possible combinations of factor levels are tested.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • Fraction defective

    In statistical quality control, that portion of a number of units or the output of a process that is defective.

  • Generating function

    A function that is used to determine properties of the probability distribution of a random variable. See Moment-generating function

  • Geometric mean.

    The geometric mean of a set of n positive data values is the nth root of the product of the data values; that is, g x i n i n = ( ) = / w 1 1 .

  • Goodness of fit

    In general, the agreement of a set of observed values and a set of theoretical values that depend on some hypothesis. The term is often used in itting a theoretical distribution to a set of observations.

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .

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