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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 15: Tests of Significance: The Basics

Full solutions for The Basic Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780716774785

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 15: Tests of Significance: The Basics

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 15
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Textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics
Edition: 4
Author: David S. Moore
ISBN: 9780716774785

The Basic Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716774785. Chapter Chapter 15: Tests of Significance: The Basics includes 56 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics, edition: 4. Since 56 problems in chapter Chapter 15: Tests of Significance: The Basics have been answered, more than 7534 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Bernoulli trials

    Sequences of independent trials with only two outcomes, generally called “success” and “failure,” in which the probability of success remains constant.

  • Box plot (or box and whisker plot)

    A graphical display of data in which the box contains the middle 50% of the data (the interquartile range) with the median dividing it, and the whiskers extend to the smallest and largest values (or some deined lower and upper limits).

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Central composite design (CCD)

    A second-order response surface design in k variables consisting of a two-level factorial, 2k axial runs, and one or more center points. The two-level factorial portion of a CCD can be a fractional factorial design when k is large. The CCD is the most widely used design for itting a second-order model.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conidence coeficient

    The probability 1?a associated with a conidence interval expressing the probability that the stated interval will contain the true parameter value.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Conidence level

    Another term for the conidence coeficient.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Critical region

    In hypothesis testing, this is the portion of the sample space of a test statistic that will lead to rejection of the null hypothesis.

  • Exponential random variable

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • F-test

    Any test of signiicance involving the F distribution. The most common F-tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variances or standard deviations of two independent normal distributions, (2) testing hypotheses about treatment means or variance components in the analysis of variance, and (3) testing signiicance of regression or tests on subsets of parameters in a regression model.

  • False alarm

    A signal from a control chart when no assignable causes are present

  • Fractional factorial experiment

    A type of factorial experiment in which not all possible treatment combinations are run. This is usually done to reduce the size of an experiment with several factors.

  • Gamma random variable

    A random variable that generalizes an Erlang random variable to noninteger values of the parameter r

  • Harmonic mean

    The harmonic mean of a set of data values is the reciprocal of the arithmetic mean of the reciprocals of the data values; that is, h n x i n i = ? ? ? ? ? = ? ? 1 1 1 1 g .

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