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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 17: From Exploration to Inference: Part II Review

Full solutions for The Basic Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780716774785

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 17: From Exploration to Inference: Part II Review

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 17
4 5 0 319 Reviews
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Textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics
Edition: 4
Author: David S. Moore
ISBN: 9780716774785

Chapter Chapter 17: From Exploration to Inference: Part II Review includes 73 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 73 problems in chapter Chapter 17: From Exploration to Inference: Part II Review have been answered, more than 10648 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. The Basic Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716774785. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics, edition: 4.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Binomial random variable

    A discrete random variable that equals the number of successes in a ixed number of Bernoulli trials.

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Degrees of freedom.

    The number of independent comparisons that can be made among the elements of a sample. The term is analogous to the number of degrees of freedom for an object in a dynamic system, which is the number of independent coordinates required to determine the motion of the object.

  • Deming

    W. Edwards Deming (1900–1993) was a leader in the use of statistical quality control.

  • Error propagation

    An analysis of how the variance of the random variable that represents that output of a system depends on the variances of the inputs. A formula exists when the output is a linear function of the inputs and the formula is simpliied if the inputs are assumed to be independent.

  • Error variance

    The variance of an error term or component in a model.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • F-test

    Any test of signiicance involving the F distribution. The most common F-tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variances or standard deviations of two independent normal distributions, (2) testing hypotheses about treatment means or variance components in the analysis of variance, and (3) testing signiicance of regression or tests on subsets of parameters in a regression model.

  • Finite population correction factor

    A term in the formula for the variance of a hypergeometric random variable.

  • First-order model

    A model that contains only irstorder terms. For example, the irst-order response surface model in two variables is y xx = + ?? ? ? 0 11 2 2 + + . A irst-order model is also called a main effects model

  • Gaussian distribution

    Another name for the normal distribution, based on the strong connection of Karl F. Gauss to the normal distribution; often used in physics and electrical engineering applications

  • Geometric mean.

    The geometric mean of a set of n positive data values is the nth root of the product of the data values; that is, g x i n i n = ( ) = / w 1 1 .

  • Hat matrix.

    In multiple regression, the matrix H XXX X = ( ) ? ? -1 . This a projection matrix that maps the vector of observed response values into a vector of itted values by yˆ = = X X X X y Hy ( ) ? ? ?1 .

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