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Solutions for Chapter Chapter 27: Statistical Process Control

Full solutions for The Basic Practice of Statistics | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780716774785

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 27: Statistical Process Control

Solutions for Chapter Chapter 27
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Textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics
Edition: 4
Author: David S. Moore
ISBN: 9780716774785

Since 53 problems in chapter Chapter 27: Statistical Process Control have been answered, more than 11923 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. The Basic Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780716774785. Chapter Chapter 27: Statistical Process Control includes 53 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Basic Practice of Statistics, edition: 4.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Additivity property of x 2

    If two independent random variables X1 and X2 are distributed as chi-square with v1 and v2 degrees of freedom, respectively, Y = + X X 1 2 is a chi-square random variable with u = + v v 1 2 degrees of freedom. This generalizes to any number of independent chi-square random variables.

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Chi-square test

    Any test of signiicance based on the chi-square distribution. The most common chi-square tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variance or standard deviation of a normal distribution and (2) testing goodness of it of a theoretical distribution to sample data

  • Coeficient of determination

    See R 2 .

  • Combination.

    A subset selected without replacement from a set used to determine the number of outcomes in events and sample spaces.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conditional variance.

    The variance of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Continuous uniform random variable

    A continuous random variable with range of a inite interval and a constant probability density function.

  • Control limits

    See Control chart.

  • Correlation matrix

    A square matrix that contains the correlations among a set of random variables, say, XX X 1 2 k , ,…, . The main diagonal elements of the matrix are unity and the off-diagonal elements rij are the correlations between Xi and Xj .

  • Degrees of freedom.

    The number of independent comparisons that can be made among the elements of a sample. The term is analogous to the number of degrees of freedom for an object in a dynamic system, which is the number of independent coordinates required to determine the motion of the object.

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Dependent variable

    The response variable in regression or a designed experiment.

  • Discrete random variable

    A random variable with a inite (or countably ininite) range.

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Fraction defective

    In statistical quality control, that portion of a number of units or the output of a process that is defective.

  • Fractional factorial experiment

    A type of factorial experiment in which not all possible treatment combinations are run. This is usually done to reduce the size of an experiment with several factors.

  • Frequency distribution

    An arrangement of the frequencies of observations in a sample or population according to the values that the observations take on

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