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Solutions for Chapter 7.3: Sample Means

The Practice of Statistics | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9781464108730 | Authors: Daren S. Starnes, Josh Tabor

Full solutions for The Practice of Statistics | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9781464108730

The Practice of Statistics | 5th Edition | ISBN: 9781464108730 | Authors: Daren S. Starnes, Josh Tabor

Solutions for Chapter 7.3: Sample Means

Solutions for Chapter 7.3
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Textbook: The Practice of Statistics
Edition: 5
Author: Daren S. Starnes, Josh Tabor
ISBN: 9781464108730

Summary of Chapter 7.3: Sample Means

Sample proportions arise most often when we are interested in categorical variables. You learned about the shape, center, and spread of the sampling distribution of a sample mean. When the population is Normal. Also to explain how the shape of the sampling distribution is affected by the shape of the population distribution and the sample size.

This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Practice of Statistics, edition: 5. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 24 problems in chapter 7.3: Sample Means have been answered, more than 308429 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. The Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781464108730. Chapter 7.3: Sample Means includes 24 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Attribute

    A qualitative characteristic of an item or unit, usually arising in quality control. For example, classifying production units as defective or nondefective results in attributes data.

  • Average

    See Arithmetic mean.

  • Central limit theorem

    The simplest form of the central limit theorem states that the sum of n independently distributed random variables will tend to be normally distributed as n becomes large. It is a necessary and suficient condition that none of the variances of the individual random variables are large in comparison to their sum. There are more general forms of the central theorem that allow ininite variances and correlated random variables, and there is a multivariate version of the theorem.

  • Completely randomized design (or experiment)

    A type of experimental design in which the treatments or design factors are assigned to the experimental units in a random manner. In designed experiments, a completely randomized design results from running all of the treatment combinations in random order.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Contingency table.

    A tabular arrangement expressing the assignment of members of a data set according to two or more categories or classiication criteria

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Dependent variable

    The response variable in regression or a designed experiment.

  • Distribution free method(s)

    Any method of inference (hypothesis testing or conidence interval construction) that does not depend on the form of the underlying distribution of the observations. Sometimes called nonparametric method(s).

  • Error sum of squares

    In analysis of variance, this is the portion of total variability that is due to the random component in the data. It is usually based on replication of observations at certain treatment combinations in the experiment. It is sometimes called the residual sum of squares, although this is really a better term to use only when the sum of squares is based on the remnants of a model-itting process and not on replication.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • Experiment

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

  • F-test

    Any test of signiicance involving the F distribution. The most common F-tests are (1) testing hypotheses about the variances or standard deviations of two independent normal distributions, (2) testing hypotheses about treatment means or variance components in the analysis of variance, and (3) testing signiicance of regression or tests on subsets of parameters in a regression model.

  • Fraction defective

    In statistical quality control, that portion of a number of units or the output of a process that is defective.

  • Geometric mean.

    The geometric mean of a set of n positive data values is the nth root of the product of the data values; that is, g x i n i n = ( ) = / w 1 1 .