Solutions for Chapter 7: Sampling Distributions

Full solutions for The Practice of Statistics | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9781464108730

Solutions for Chapter 7: Sampling Distributions

Solutions for Chapter 7
4 5 0 346 Reviews
21
3
Textbook: The Practice of Statistics
Edition: 5
Author: Daren S. Starnes, Josh Tabor
ISBN: 9781464108730

Since 45 problems in chapter 7: Sampling Distributions have been answered, more than 8954 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Practice of Statistics, edition: 5. The Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781464108730. Chapter 7: Sampling Distributions includes 45 full step-by-step solutions.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • Alias

    In a fractional factorial experiment when certain factor effects cannot be estimated uniquely, they are said to be aliased.

  • Asymptotic relative eficiency (ARE)

    Used to compare hypothesis tests. The ARE of one test relative to another is the limiting ratio of the sample sizes necessary to obtain identical error probabilities for the two procedures.

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Bivariate normal distribution

    The joint distribution of two normal random variables

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Conditional probability

    The probability of an event given that the random experiment produces an outcome in another event.

  • Conditional probability density function

    The probability density function of the conditional probability distribution of a continuous random variable.

  • Consistent estimator

    An estimator that converges in probability to the true value of the estimated parameter as the sample size increases.

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Correction factor

    A term used for the quantity ( / )( ) 1 1 2 n xi i n ? = that is subtracted from xi i n 2 ? =1 to give the corrected sum of squares deined as (/ ) ( ) 1 1 2 n xx i x i n ? = i ? . The correction factor can also be written as nx 2 .

  • Counting techniques

    Formulas used to determine the number of elements in sample spaces and events.

  • Covariance

    A measure of association between two random variables obtained as the expected value of the product of the two random variables around their means; that is, Cov(X Y, ) [( )( )] =? ? E X Y ? ? X Y .

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Eficiency

    A concept in parameter estimation that uses the variances of different estimators; essentially, an estimator is more eficient than another estimator if it has smaller variance. When estimators are biased, the concept requires modiication.

  • F distribution.

    The distribution of the random variable deined as the ratio of two independent chi-square random variables, each divided by its number of degrees of freedom.

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

×
Log in to StudySoup
Get Full Access to The Practice of Statistics

Forgot password? Reset password here

Join StudySoup for FREE
Get Full Access to The Practice of Statistics
Join with Email
Already have an account? Login here
Reset your password

I don't want to reset my password

Need help? Contact support

Need an Account? Is not associated with an account
Sign up
We're here to help

Having trouble accessing your account? Let us help you, contact support at +1(510) 944-1054 or support@studysoup.com

Got it, thanks!
Password Reset Request Sent An email has been sent to the email address associated to your account. Follow the link in the email to reset your password. If you're having trouble finding our email please check your spam folder
Got it, thanks!
Already have an Account? Is already in use
Log in
Incorrect Password The password used to log in with this account is incorrect
Try Again

Forgot password? Reset it here