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Solutions for Chapter 11.1: Chi-Square Tests for Goodness of Fit

Full solutions for The Practice of Statistics | 5th Edition

ISBN: 9781464108730

Solutions for Chapter 11.1: Chi-Square Tests for Goodness of Fit

Solutions for Chapter 11.1
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Textbook: The Practice of Statistics
Edition: 5
Author: Daren S. Starnes, Josh Tabor
ISBN: 9781464108730

Chapter 11.1: Chi-Square Tests for Goodness of Fit includes 26 full step-by-step solutions. Since 26 problems in chapter 11.1: Chi-Square Tests for Goodness of Fit have been answered, more than 35547 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. The Practice of Statistics was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781464108730. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: The Practice of Statistics, edition: 5.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • `-error (or `-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by rejecting a null hypothesis when it is actually true (also called a type I error).

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Bayes’ estimator

    An estimator for a parameter obtained from a Bayesian method that uses a prior distribution for the parameter along with the conditional distribution of the data given the parameter to obtain the posterior distribution of the parameter. The estimator is obtained from the posterior distribution.

  • Bayes’ theorem

    An equation for a conditional probability such as PA B ( | ) in terms of the reverse conditional probability PB A ( | ).

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Block

    In experimental design, a group of experimental units or material that is relatively homogeneous. The purpose of dividing experimental units into blocks is to produce an experimental design wherein variability within blocks is smaller than variability between blocks. This allows the factors of interest to be compared in an environment that has less variability than in an unblocked experiment.

  • Center line

    A horizontal line on a control chart at the value that estimates the mean of the statistic plotted on the chart. See Control chart.

  • Components of variance

    The individual components of the total variance that are attributable to speciic sources. This usually refers to the individual variance components arising from a random or mixed model analysis of variance.

  • Conditional probability distribution

    The distribution of a random variable given that the random experiment produces an outcome in an event. The given event might specify values for one or more other random variables

  • Conditional variance.

    The variance of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Continuous random variable.

    A random variable with an interval (either inite or ininite) of real numbers for its range.

  • Convolution

    A method to derive the probability density function of the sum of two independent random variables from an integral (or sum) of probability density (or mass) functions.

  • Cook’s distance

    In regression, Cook’s distance is a measure of the inluence of each individual observation on the estimates of the regression model parameters. It expresses the distance that the vector of model parameter estimates with the ith observation removed lies from the vector of model parameter estimates based on all observations. Large values of Cook’s distance indicate that the observation is inluential.

  • Correlation coeficient

    A dimensionless measure of the linear association between two variables, usually lying in the interval from ?1 to +1, with zero indicating the absence of correlation (but not necessarily the independence of the two variables).

  • Cumulative normal distribution function

    The cumulative distribution of the standard normal distribution, often denoted as ?( ) x and tabulated in Appendix Table II.

  • Estimator (or point estimator)

    A procedure for producing an estimate of a parameter of interest. An estimator is usually a function of only sample data values, and when these data values are available, it results in an estimate of the parameter of interest.

  • Exhaustive

    A property of a collection of events that indicates that their union equals the sample space.

  • Fisher’s least signiicant difference (LSD) method

    A series of pair-wise hypothesis tests of treatment means in an experiment to determine which means differ.

  • Frequency distribution

    An arrangement of the frequencies of observations in a sample or population according to the values that the observations take on

  • Geometric random variable

    A discrete random variable that is the number of Bernoulli trials until a success occurs.

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