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Solutions for Chapter 10.3: Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers 6th Edition

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781118539712 | Authors: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger

Full solutions for Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 6th Edition

ISBN: 9781118539712

Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers | 6th Edition | ISBN: 9781118539712 | Authors: Douglas C. Montgomery, George C. Runger

Solutions for Chapter 10.3

Chapter 10.3 includes 6 full step-by-step solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers , edition: 6. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. Since 6 problems in chapter 10.3 have been answered, more than 151746 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter. Applied Statistics and Probability for Engineers was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9781118539712.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • `-error (or `-risk)

    In hypothesis testing, an error incurred by rejecting a null hypothesis when it is actually true (also called a type I error).

  • Addition rule

    A formula used to determine the probability of the union of two (or more) events from the probabilities of the events and their intersection(s).

  • Additivity property of x 2

    If two independent random variables X1 and X2 are distributed as chi-square with v1 and v2 degrees of freedom, respectively, Y = + X X 1 2 is a chi-square random variable with u = + v v 1 2 degrees of freedom. This generalizes to any number of independent chi-square random variables.

  • All possible (subsets) regressions

    A method of variable selection in regression that examines all possible subsets of the candidate regressor variables. Eficient computer algorithms have been developed for implementing all possible regressions

  • Bias

    An effect that systematically distorts a statistical result or estimate, preventing it from representing the true quantity of interest.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Bivariate distribution

    The joint probability distribution of two random variables.

  • Causal variable

    When y fx = ( ) and y is considered to be caused by x, x is sometimes called a causal variable

  • Central composite design (CCD)

    A second-order response surface design in k variables consisting of a two-level factorial, 2k axial runs, and one or more center points. The two-level factorial portion of a CCD can be a fractional factorial design when k is large. The CCD is the most widely used design for itting a second-order model.

  • Chance cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that is due to only random forces and which cannot be traced to speciic sources, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a common cause.

  • Comparative experiment

    An experiment in which the treatments (experimental conditions) that are to be studied are included in the experiment. The data from the experiment are used to evaluate the treatments.

  • Conditional mean

    The mean of the conditional probability distribution of a random variable.

  • Conditional probability mass function

    The probability mass function of the conditional probability distribution of a discrete random variable.

  • Conidence interval

    If it is possible to write a probability statement of the form PL U ( ) ? ? ? ? = ?1 where L and U are functions of only the sample data and ? is a parameter, then the interval between L and U is called a conidence interval (or a 100 1( )% ? ? conidence interval). The interpretation is that a statement that the parameter ? lies in this interval will be true 100 1( )% ? ? of the times that such a statement is made

  • Continuity correction.

    A correction factor used to improve the approximation to binomial probabilities from a normal distribution.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Decision interval

    A parameter in a tabular CUSUM algorithm that is determined from a trade-off between false alarms and the detection of assignable causes.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Fisher’s least signiicant difference (LSD) method

    A series of pair-wise hypothesis tests of treatment means in an experiment to determine which means differ.

  • Gamma function

    A function used in the probability density function of a gamma random variable that can be considered to extend factorials

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