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Solutions for Chapter 15.5: INFERENCES ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TWO MEDIANS: INDEPENDENT SAMPLES

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321757272 | Authors: Michael Sullivan, III

Full solutions for Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 4th Edition

ISBN: 9780321757272

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data | 4th Edition | ISBN: 9780321757272 | Authors: Michael Sullivan, III

Solutions for Chapter 15.5: INFERENCES ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TWO MEDIANS: INDEPENDENT SAMPLES

Solutions for Chapter 15.5
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Textbook: Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data
Edition: 4
Author: Michael Sullivan, III
ISBN: 9780321757272

Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data was written by and is associated to the ISBN: 9780321757272. Chapter 15.5: INFERENCES ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TWO MEDIANS: INDEPENDENT SAMPLES includes 20 full step-by-step solutions. This expansive textbook survival guide covers the following chapters and their solutions. This textbook survival guide was created for the textbook: Statistics: Informed Decisions Using Data , edition: 4. Since 20 problems in chapter 15.5: INFERENCES ABOUT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN TWO MEDIANS: INDEPENDENT SAMPLES have been answered, more than 152440 students have viewed full step-by-step solutions from this chapter.

Key Statistics Terms and definitions covered in this textbook
  • 2 k factorial experiment.

    A full factorial experiment with k factors and all factors tested at only two levels (settings) each.

  • Additivity property of x 2

    If two independent random variables X1 and X2 are distributed as chi-square with v1 and v2 degrees of freedom, respectively, Y = + X X 1 2 is a chi-square random variable with u = + v v 1 2 degrees of freedom. This generalizes to any number of independent chi-square random variables.

  • Alternative hypothesis

    In statistical hypothesis testing, this is a hypothesis other than the one that is being tested. The alternative hypothesis contains feasible conditions, whereas the null hypothesis speciies conditions that are under test

  • Analytic study

    A study in which a sample from a population is used to make inference to a future population. Stability needs to be assumed. See Enumerative study

  • Assignable cause

    The portion of the variability in a set of observations that can be traced to speciic causes, such as operators, materials, or equipment. Also called a special cause.

  • Biased estimator

    Unbiased estimator.

  • Bimodal distribution.

    A distribution with two modes

  • C chart

    An attribute control chart that plots the total number of defects per unit in a subgroup. Similar to a defects-per-unit or U chart.

  • Confounding

    When a factorial experiment is run in blocks and the blocks are too small to contain a complete replicate of the experiment, one can run a fraction of the replicate in each block, but this results in losing information on some effects. These effects are linked with or confounded with the blocks. In general, when two factors are varied such that their individual effects cannot be determined separately, their effects are said to be confounded.

  • Contrast

    A linear function of treatment means with coeficients that total zero. A contrast is a summary of treatment means that is of interest in an experiment.

  • Control chart

    A graphical display used to monitor a process. It usually consists of a horizontal center line corresponding to the in-control value of the parameter that is being monitored and lower and upper control limits. The control limits are determined by statistical criteria and are not arbitrary, nor are they related to speciication limits. If sample points fall within the control limits, the process is said to be in-control, or free from assignable causes. Points beyond the control limits indicate an out-of-control process; that is, assignable causes are likely present. This signals the need to ind and remove the assignable causes.

  • Crossed factors

    Another name for factors that are arranged in a factorial experiment.

  • Deming’s 14 points.

    A management philosophy promoted by W. Edwards Deming that emphasizes the importance of change and quality

  • Dispersion

    The amount of variability exhibited by data

  • Empirical model

    A model to relate a response to one or more regressors or factors that is developed from data obtained from the system.

  • Error of estimation

    The difference between an estimated value and the true value.

  • Event

    A subset of a sample space.

  • Exhaustive

    A property of a collection of events that indicates that their union equals the sample space.

  • Expected value

    The expected value of a random variable X is its long-term average or mean value. In the continuous case, the expected value of X is E X xf x dx ( ) = ?? ( ) ? ? where f ( ) x is the density function of the random variable X.

  • Exponential random variable

    A series of tests in which changes are made to the system under study

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